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Sunday, May 10
 

10:45am

TBA
Sunday May 10, 2020 10:45am - 12:05pm
Tuscany

5:00pm

Festival Arrival Party
Join us for hosted appetizers and beverages at the Festival Arrival Party on Sunday evening, May 10, 2020, from 5:00 to 9:00 pm in the Tuscany Room on the lobby level of the Pinnacle Harbourfront Hotel.  

Sunday May 10, 2020 5:00pm - 9:00pm
Tuscany
 
Monday, May 11
 

7:00am

Registration Opens
Monday May 11, 2020 7:00am - 7:00am
TBA

7:30am

Networking Breakfast
Networking Topics and Groups:
1. BC Federation of Students
2. New to Festival
3. Open Education in Northern BC
4. Open Education in Interior BC


Monday May 11, 2020 7:30am - 8:45am
Harbourfront Ballrooms

7:30am

Breakfast
Monday May 11, 2020 7:30am - 9:00am
Harbourfront Ballrooms

8:00am

Fit Break
Speakers
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Advisor, Teaching & Learning and Researcher, Open Education Practices, BCCampus


Monday May 11, 2020 8:00am - 8:30am

8:00am

Guided Meditation
Meditation will be about 10-15 minutes. Please arrive on time.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Burgess

Mary Burgess

Executive Director, BCcampus
Open Education, Teaching and Learning, Educational Technology, Leadership, organizational change...


Monday May 11, 2020 8:00am - 8:30am

8:30am

Childcare Opens
Monday May 11, 2020 8:30am - 9:00am

9:00am

Keynote - Jess Mitchell
Speakers
avatar for Jess Mitchell

Jess Mitchell

Senior Manager, Research + Design, Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University
I am lately most fascinated with the evolving world of design, in particular ethics and design. I spend most of my time in inclusion, diversity, and equity. And am deeply committed to empowering people and helping to shift their perspective.


Monday May 11, 2020 9:00am - 10:15am
Harbourfront Ballrooms

10:15am

Coffee/Snack
Monday May 11, 2020 10:15am - 10:45am
TBA

10:45am

Maximize Empathy in eLearning through Interactive Design
Maximize Empathy in eLearning through Interactive Design

JIBC’s Center for Teaching, Learning, and Innovation will share a unique eLearning course design model to maximize empathy for learners. There are two parts to this hands-on workshop:
1. We will introduce the need for Usability Analysis in the eLearning context, showcase different types of usability testing methods, best practices, and explore Jakob Nielsen's 10 general principles on interaction.

2. Participants will be introduced to the process, tools and resources for user testing to identify technological challenges by placing themselves in learners’ shoes.
Participants will walk away with a basic understanding of usability principles, conduct a usability test of their current project, and a list of free tools and resources to help recognize design gaps and create prototypes for their next eLearning project.

Speakers
avatar for Kavita George

Kavita George

Senior Web Specialist, JIBC
avatar for Naz Maghsoudi

Naz Maghsoudi

Student & Faculty Development Coordinator, JIBC
Naz is the Coordinator of Student & Faculty Development at JIBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning & Innovation. Her focus is to educate and train faculty and students through seminars, workshops and tutorials on how to use educational technologies in teaching, learning and also day-to-day... Read More →


Monday May 11, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Salon D

10:45am

Disrupting Misconduct: Curricular Interventions that Cultivate Academic Integrity
Disrupting Misconduct: Curricular Interventions that Cultivate Academic Integrity

Academic integrity – or, rather, violations or a lack of academic integrity – remains an urgent issue for higher education, one that attracts both media and administrative attention and collective hand-wringing (and finger-pointing). Discussions and policies in higher education institutions typically focus on academic misconduct, warning students of consequences for cheating, and advising instructors on mechanisms to catch them (e.g., K and Gupta, 2016; Ho, 2015; Wang, 2008). Such a framework, we argue, perpetuates a default deficiency model that assumes students will “break the rules,” whether or not they know what those rules are or why they are important, other than not getting caught. More problematically, it risks causing institutional harm by punishing students for knowledge they don’t have (Kier 2014), not only about academic integrity but also about the university and its practices — knowledge gaps that, we note, will be more significant or apparent for non-dominant members of the student body.

In this session, we share the results of a three-year project in first-year writing courses that seeks to disrupt this dominant framework and instead cultivate a “culture of integrity” by taking a “proactive rather than punitive approach” (Eaton and Edino 2018) that seeks to close the gap between our expectations of academic integrity and students’ understanding of those expectations. We outline scenarios that showcase how we created explicit and enhanced instruction on academic integrity that invites students, as members of diverse disciplinary communities and as apprentice scholars, to uphold the expectations of ethical knowledge production, and shows them how to do so in their fields of study. Then, to close the session, we invite audience members to reflect on their own pedagogical approaches to academic integrity before working together to define academic integrity in their particular disciplinary context. This activity provides audience members with tools for the development and implementation of proactive practices in their classroom, and opportunities to disrupt teaching and learning frameworks that focus on misconduct.

Speakers
LM

Laurie McNeill

University of British Columbia


Monday May 11, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Tuscany

10:45am

Peer-Based Engagement in Online and Hybrid Learning Spaces
This presentation will explore strategies for how students engage both with the course materials as well as each other in both fully online and hybrid teaching spaces to create a successful online learning environment for both the students and instructor. While technology can create barriers for learning and classroom interaction, it can also create new ways for students and instructors to work together.

Students in online and hybrid courses need additional guidance to succeed in the online learning environment (Crawley and Fetzner 7). Teaching in online spaces requires strategic planning for student engagement as a vital component of the course design. This presentation will approach that strategy while incorporating perspectives of active learning, peer-based learning and universal design for learning while focusing activities at different stages of a course with the stages of group dynamics.

The focus will be on creating an environment of peer-based learning, where students share learning in multiple ways. The online learning space is viewed as part of “a collaborative learning process in which the instructor and learner are partners in building the knowledge base” (Conrad and Donaldson 6). Participants will be shown a model and learn strategies for peer-based engagement to incorporate into a whole course design to engage students from the moment they gain access to the course, until the course is finished.

Speakers
avatar for Holly Flauto Salmon

Holly Flauto Salmon

Faculty Coordinator, Learning Centre, Douglas College


Monday May 11, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Ballroom 2

10:45am

Redesigning for Disruption in Post-Secondary Education: Who Decides What and How?
Description:
Post-secondary faculty and leaders are facing increasing pressure to change the way higher education is designed in order to address changing and expanding societal expectations and disruption. Examples include:
  • graduates that are ready for the workforce of tomorrow;
  • schools that do more to engage students and ensure that they learn more and better;
  • curriculum that addresses the right balance of hard technical skills and human or soft skills;
  • as well as many other demands including the integration of technology and the digital world into every aspect of the educational experience.
But who decides? In this session, we will focus on the role of the many stakeholders that seek to influence the design and construction of what and how our institutions teach.
 
Key takeaways from this session include:
·         an examination of forces for change and evolving societal expectations;
·         theories/frameworks that may help to clarify decision-making; and
·         a list of critical questions related to future curriculum and program decisions.



Monday May 11, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Ballroom 3

10:45am

Apply Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to OER
One goal of open education is to lower the cost of education by replacing commercial materials with open educational resources (OER) that are free for students. But access to education isn’t just determined by cost – the design of these resources can also play a huge role in determining access and success.

Often the little changes reap the greatest rewards, so join us to explore how applying Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to OER can help your students. We will explore the different types of barriers that students face, and we will look at how the UDL framework can be applied to the design of OER to reduce barriers for all learners and give students more agency in how they engage with the material.

Speakers
avatar for Josie Gray

Josie Gray

Advisor, Inclusive Design and OER Collections, BCcampus
Josie is the Coordinator of Collection Quality at BCcampus. She manages the B.C. Open Textbook Collection and provides training and support for B.C. faculty publishing open textbooks in Pressbooks. Josie has been learning about and teaching accessibility best practices in OER for... Read More →


Monday May 11, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Ballroom 1

10:45am

Diversity Circles: Creating a campus culture that models positive responses to diversity guided by an Indigenous framework
Diversity Circles: Creating a campus culture that models positive responses to diversity guided by an Indigenous framework

Following a successful 2-year pilot funded by SSHRC, Diversity Circles has moved into being a regular funded BCIT initiative within the Office of Respect, Diversity, and Inclusion at BCIT. Yet Diversity Circles is not a typical D & I model; using an Indigenous framework we bring stakeholders together from each area and level of the organization, flattening bureaucratic hierarchies and creating safe spaces to have difficult and enriching conversations.

This interactive session will present our strengths-based model which follows an Indigenous framework for positively encountering diversity. This includes increasing our sensitivity to various forms of diversity such as Indigenous and other cultural groups, gender identity, and neurodiversity, and learning to leverage diversity on our teams. Through sharing of personal and family stories we can recognize how diverse connections to land and language can form a shared fabric among participants. During the session we will break into small groups to discuss specific examples and strategies for our own contexts, and share back to the big group.

Speakers
SK

Shannon Kelly

Continuing Education Program Head, School of Computing and Academic Studies, British Columbia Institute of Technology
BCIT
ZJ

Zaa Joseph

Advisor, BCIT


Monday May 11, 2020 10:45am - 12:05pm
Salon E

10:45am

Transforming Student Learning Skills Through Collaborative Practice​
How can disrupting our ways of working together enhance our ability to transform teaching practices in effective and sustainable ways? Our desire to respond effectively to the needs of learners with diverse cultural backgrounds and diverse learning needs leads us to renew our practices.  We observe that for our students to succeed, we must effectively support them in learning new disciplinary cultures (Wingate, 2018), as we use universal design principles to enhance student access to learning experiences (Boothe, Lohmann, Donnell, & Hall, 2018).  

This workshop engages participants in exploring a model developed by the Kwantlen Polytechnic School of Business, Learning Centres, and Teaching & Learning Commons where faculty are actively engaged in re-thinking teaching practices in ways that incorporate UDL while speaking the language of their discipline.

Objectives:

By the end of this session, participants will:
• identify learning skills “bottlenecks” that hinder academic success in particular disciplines (Middendorf & Shopkow, 2018)
• explore a model for enhancing student acquisition of core learning skills through assignment audits, skills audits, scaffolding assignments, and the strategic integration of learning modules;
• explore ways in which learning technology and the use of UDL can support the integration of key learning skills into courses; and
• consider the ways in which enhanced collaboration between teaching faculty and teaching-learning support professionals can enhance the practice of all.
Session Methods:
1. Discussion: Participants will first engage in interactive discussion, with option to participate verbally or through an e-discussion tool (e.g Poll Everywhere),
2. Case Study Sharing: Next, we will explore a model for partnership between faculty, the Learning Centre, Teaching & Learning Commons, and the tools that were designed to facilitate UDL implementation in a discipline-specific (School of Business) context. A case study will be shared that details the implementation of the model in a course and the outcome of this pilot.
3.        Engagement with Tools and Personal Application Participants can choose to engage with video, online tools, and written materials to experience the resources available.  Finally, participants will work in self-selected small groups to explore how similar approaches might be implemented through partnerships in their environment.

Speakers
avatar for Lesley McCannell

Lesley McCannell

Professor, School of Business, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
avatar for Christina Page

Christina Page

Learning Strategist, Kwantlen Polytechnic University


Monday May 11, 2020 10:45am - 12:05pm
Salon F

11:15am

Transition
Monday May 11, 2020 11:15am - 11:35am
TBA

11:35am

Blended Online Learning Models in Chennai, India
TWU recently launched a Facilitated Academic Resource and Research Centre in Chennai, India, using a model of teaching and learning that blends online and face-to-face learning. In the coming years, we plan to open more centres in Uganda, China, and other international locations. The unique challenges associated with the model and with offering effective learning opportunities to diverse student populations yet maintaining consistency of learning experiences led us to design a flexible, collaborative, and version-controlled technological infrastructure for supporting the design and delivery of course materials. We use a combination of MS Word, Markdown files in Github, Grav CMS, and Moodle to create and share differentiated course materials to different locations while maintaining a single repository for all versions of the course. This presentation will demonstrate the underlying infrastructure and the technical design features in our courses that allow for this model. Topics will include challenges of the model, lessons learned so far, as well as next steps for further development of our processes and infrastructure.

Speakers
avatar for Colin Madland

Colin Madland

Manager, Online Shenanigans, Trinity Western University


Monday May 11, 2020 11:35am - 12:05pm
Ballroom 2

11:35am

Indigenization Policy at Camosun College
Indigenization is an ongoing phase of consultation, collaboration, action, and reflection that is focused on: curriculum planning and delivery; services to Indigenous students; employee education; and, policy and planning at Camosun College. Since 2006, the college has engaged in how to create an Indigenized culture and way of doing across all levels of the institution. While there have been empowering champions and early adopters of Indigenization, we worked within an environment where the priority of Indigenization could shift inadvertently. So, over the past few years, Camosun has worked on developing an Indigenization policy that articulates the commitment and vision of Camosun in its ongoing work of Indigenization across and within all areas of the College. The presenters will identify the opportunities and challenges associated with operationalizing an Indigenization policy, and demonstrate how Indigenous and non-Indigenous allies can Indigenize post-secondary education at the institutional level. Presenters will also engage with participants through guided inquiry on ways Indigenization has reached various levels of public post-secondary and the challenges and opportunities for Indigenous self-determination and reconciliation at our institutions.


Monday May 11, 2020 11:35am - 12:05pm
Ballroom 3

11:35am

The Fast-Changing World of Work is Disrupting our Teaching!
This presentation is aimed at sharing the process and results from a research study funded in full through a grant from BCcampus, Open Education.

The lack of research in trades vocational education and training (TVET) pertaining to OER/OEP means that the benefits that open educational resources/open educational practices (OER/OEP enable remain unrealized. While numerous researchers have examined the use of OER and OEP in K-12 and higher education settings, there has been very little research conducted in the context of vocational training and OER/OEP. In Canada alone, there were 417,300 registered apprenticeships in 2016 and registrations have grown over 200% since the 1990s. This proposed thought leadership resource, built for educators by educators, will address a much-needed understanding of how OER/OEP may be used in TVET for the purpose of forging a new path for apprenticeship completion, especially in the face of trade harmonization and the developing link between it and open pedagogy. This collaborative project between Vancouver Island University and the British Columbia Institute of Technology is in part a testimony to that endeavor.

The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify current digital teaching and learning practices used in Trades program throughout BC as a means to investigate the inclusivity of these practices. To further this study, instructor perceptions regarding digital teaching and learning practices, and current competency levels of digital literacy was explored. Insights gained from this study are aimed to identify current barriers to trades faculty access and development of digital teaching and learning practices that are used in BC. Secondly, these insights have grounded the researcher’s decisions in mapping a professional development plan that will ultimately aim to influence curriculum design, program development, and pedagogical practices.

At the end of the presentation, the professional development plan will be shared with those attending as well as being made available to others through BCcampus.


Speakers
avatar for Sally Vinden

Sally Vinden

Instructor / PhD Candidate, Vancouver Island University / Simon Fraser University
Trades and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)Curriculum and Pedagogy International Development of TVET


Monday May 11, 2020 11:35am - 12:05pm
Salon D

12:05pm

Lunch
Monday May 11, 2020 12:05pm - 1:15pm
Harbourfront Ballrooms

12:05pm

12:30pm

Fit Break
Speakers
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Advisor, Teaching & Learning and Researcher, Open Education Practices, BCCampus


Monday May 11, 2020 12:30pm - 1:00pm

1:15pm

Place based assignments and Intercultural learning: Sharing our stories.
Title: Place based assignments and Intercultural learning: Sharing our stories.

From an educator’s perspective, the myriad of world views and experiences of students in the classroom provide opportunities for new ways of knowing, seeing, and experiencing the world. Place-based education has the capacity to extend the learning community beyond the parameters of the university and to bring Indigenous and non-Indigenous, domestic and international students into conversations about the local landscapes we occupy.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) report included “Calls to Action” inviting post-secondary institutions to integrate Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods in order to build capacity for understanding, empathy, and respect. This invitation is important and at the same time intimidating: as a non-Indigenous instructor, Indigenous histories, knowledge and stories do not belong to me.

But what if we begin the conversation with intercultural learning, and make room for multiple narratives and perspectives of place that include Indigenous-non-Indigenous, domestic, and international students? A common theme arising from intercultural and place-based pedagogies is the importance of understanding histories and the political and cultural context in which world views of individuals and societies have emerged. Perhaps my role as a non-indigenous instructor is to create a safe environment and hold space for difficult conversations to take place.

Often students arrive on our campuses with limited knowledge or preconceived notions of the places they have come to live and study. Place-based assignments that challenge or stimulate reflection on previous assumptions enable global and local perspectives to inform each other. When students are given opportunities to share and reflect upon different world views, an opportunity arises to shift attitudes and build intercultural understanding particularly in context of local and global Indigenous and colonial histories.

In this session I will draw on student reflections of colonial histories and contemporary Indigenous issues to illustrate how Indigenous focused place-based pedagogy can create “aha” moments for students and instructors. While the reflections are selected from undergraduate courses in tourism, this session is designed to engage faculty and practitioners across disciplines in conversations about how to situate Indigenous histories and place knowledge at the center of intercultural learning and teaching.

Speakers
avatar for Robin Reid

Robin Reid

Faculty of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism, Thompson Rivers University
Robin Reid is an Assistant Professor in the Tourism Management Department at TRU. Her involvement with TRU’s Pedagogy of Place Research Group and TRU’s Interculturalizing the Curriculum program provides a background for pedagogical re-visioning and curriculum development that... Read More →


Monday May 11, 2020 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Ballroom 1

1:15pm

Developing a University's Learning, Teaching, and Research Strategy using a PAR Approach
Developing a university’s learning, teaching and research strategy using a participatory action research approach.

In this session, we examine how an institutional Learning, Teaching, and Research Model (LTRM) (Harris, Walinga, Childs, Raby, Takach, Jorgenson, Mason, Zornes, Gorley, and Forssman, 2018) enables Royal Roads University (RRU) to enact its vision and values in the creation of a signature student experience in virtual and physical spaces. The LTRM was created through a participatory action research project with the aim of renewing an existing model (Hamilton, Márquez, & Agger-Gupta, 2013) and responding to the changing landscape of post-secondary education. An extensive consultation process with permanent and contract faculty, staff, students, alumni, school advisory councils, Indigenous groups, senior leaders, and other stakeholders was conducted over 18 months. Multiple data collection methods were used, including surveys, interviews, focus groups, design thinking maker experiences (Crichton & Carter, 2015; Stanford University Institute of Design, 2016), and consultations with experts. A variety of recording methods were used, including graphic recording, audio and video recording, as well as the creation of 3-dimensional metaphors (Crichton & Carter, 2017). An open data approach was undertaken for this research, i.e., providing all stakeholders access to de-identified data, to allow for a transparent and iterative meaning-making process.

The LTRM has become RRU’s signature pedagogy, the distinctive teaching and learning practices characteristic to the education of future practitioners in a given field (Shulman, 2005). Signature pedagogies teach knowledge, skills, and foster worldviews, attitudes, and values; in doing so, they shape future practice, and set the direction for practitioners. The LTRM supports RRU’s commitment to building capacity in mid-career professionals, enabling them to be agents of transformation for positive social change. A recent literature search confirms that the LTRM is unique in its formation and scope, as well as in the impact it has on an institutions approach towards creating an engaging, innovative and effective learning environment.

In this session, we will examine how the LTRM can be used to create a transformational student learning experience. Themes emerging from the action research project will be shared, and the implications will be explored with audience participants in this interactive session.

Speakers
avatar for Jo Axe

Jo Axe

Professor, School of Education and Technology, Royal Roads University
Royal Roads University


Monday May 11, 2020 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Salon D

1:15pm

The Mind the Gap Program
Title:  The Mind the Gap Program:  Faculty Participants Reflect on their Collaborative Projects with K – 12 Teachers
Proposal Description
Though not well-addressed in the student success and persistence literature, there appears to be a significant role for K-12 teachers and post-secondary faculty members to play in easing the transition and supporting student success and persistence from secondary to post-secondary school (Rodriguez, et al. 2017). K-16 partnerships are a critical first step in helping faculty members and teachers develop a deeper understanding of the issues, challenges, and changes in secondary education, while providing a platform for faculty members to describe and clarify the expectations required for students at the post-secondary level (Rodriguez et al., 2017). Essential to this transition is the communication between the instructors of the two sectors. School-university partnerships which are deliberately designed to have mutuality in roles and relationships, are oriented toward working together and have a shared conceptual understanding, are more likely to be sustainable and lead to increased outcomes for students (Walsh & Backe, 2013).
This presentation will provide background and information about the Mind the Gap program at Thompson Rivers University (TRU) with specific emphasis on the experiences of faculty who developed collaborative K-16 projects. Running since 2018, the Mind the Gap program brings together K -12 teachers with TRU faculty members to provide engaging opportunities for secondary school students to extend their learning as they transition to post-secondary school. Their collaborative projects often include bringing elementary and secondary students to TRU to experience post-secondary classes and events. During this presentation, three TRU faculty members will share how their projects came to be, and will reflect on how their collaborative project disrupted and transformed their teaching as well as the learning of their student participants.
Key discussion topics will address bridging the divide between educational institutions and instructors to provide enhanced support and knowledge sharing, with the ultimate goal of enhancing the educational experience of all learners.

Speakers
SL

Susan Lidster

Thompson Rivers University


Monday May 11, 2020 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Ballroom 2

1:15pm

Shifting Towards a UDL Mindset
Universal Design for Learning (UDL) has the potential to disrupt and transform higher education, increasing access and engagement for many learners. But it can sometimes be hard to know how to start the UDL conversation with colleagues and leaders. While you might be tempted to launch into your UDL elevator pitch or whip out a dog-eared graphic of the UDL principles, this TED Talk style session introduces six ways to start the conversation by helping shift thinking towards a UDL mindset in your everyday conversations. These shifts help us listen better, make better use of the conversations, and build better relationships in UDL learning and implementation.  In this session, we will describe each of the six shifts, give examples, and share tools for capitalizing on opportunities to shift towards a UDL mindset in everyday conversations. If you are starting - or would like to start - UDL conversations on your campus, this session will give you some new ideas to try. 

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Fraser

Ruth Fraser

Associate Director Student Affairs and Services, Douglas College
Ruth Fraser is a Student Services administrator, currently working at Douglas College in Vancouver, BC. The focus of her work is to advance accessibility in higher education by changing how we think about and serve students with disabilities. She has 15 years experience in higher... Read More →


Monday May 11, 2020 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Ballroom 3

1:15pm

Developing and Sharing Open Educational Resources with Grav
Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptop to this session
Tech curious educators and authors - want to support more open and collaborative materials, inside or outside of other platforms? Are you looking for a more flexible workflow and environment than what traditional CMSs like WordPress provides? Faced with these challenges, Paul Hibbitts developed a set of open source components for the file-based Grav CMS to work with his CMPT-363 Canvas course.

The modern CMS Grav uses the platform-independent Markdown format and enables version-controlled editing with Git services such as GitHub and GitLab. These also naturally support the 5 Rs (Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix and Redistribute) of Open Educational Resources. Integrating Grav pages within other systems (e.g. LMSs) is seamless too - without any content restrictions. In this session, participants will get to explore Markdown and the latest release of Grav with various open education-related projects (such as the Open Course/MultiCourse Hub and Open Publishing Space). You can also learn more about these Grav projects, and how Grav works with Markdown and Git, at hibbittsdesign.org.



Speakers
avatar for Paul Hibbitts

Paul Hibbitts

Educator, Interaction Designer and Open Source Author, SFU / Hibbitts Design


Monday May 11, 2020 1:15pm - 2:35pm
Salon F

1:15pm

Strategies for Scaling & Sustaining Successful OER Initiatives
Open Education is thriving globally and in particular in British Columbia. At the same time, open education does disrupt the status quo of an academic institution and challenges the systems in place within the institution. This pre conference workshop will examine the disruption and provide actionable ways forward to integrate open education into one’s institution.



The pre conference workshop will describe the history of open education in British Columbia and the role BC institutions have played in its success. Participants will examine the connections and implementation of distance and blended learning in institutions and the parallels to open education practices. Further, participants will take a look at their own identities as it relates to open education- their origin stories of how they were drawn to the work of open education. Once individual identities have been identified, participants will take a closer look at their institutional culture. Each participant will review their institutional mission/vision, and one strategic document and scan for words or phrases that are aligned with open. (Access, Affordability, Change, Future). Based on initial research findings by Tannis Morgan, we will then highlight the ways in which open education practices have been implemented successfully at institutions. What are the success factors? Are there themes that emerged that can provide insight to other institutions? Finally, using a planner tool developed participants will write out and document how to do the following in their own institutions:

Building Awareness and Enthusiasm
Supporting Faculty through Change
Monitoring and Celebrating Impact


Strategies for Scaling & Sustaining Successful OER Initiatives: Workshop Planning Template by Lumen Learning is CC BY

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Director Open Education, BCCampus
Amanda Coolidge is the Director of Open Education at BCcampus. She leads the BC Open Textbook Project as well as the Open Education initiatives in the province of British Columbia, Canada. The BCcampus Open Education team produces Open Educational Resources (OER) – textbooks, toolkits... Read More →


Monday May 11, 2020 1:15pm - 4:00pm
Salon E

1:45pm

Transition
Monday May 11, 2020 1:45pm - 2:05pm
TBA

2:05pm

Lightning Session
1. National Scan of UDL in Canadian Higher Education
Ruth Fraser, Seanna Takacs
Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an exciting disrupter relatively new to the scene of Canadian higher education. It is challenging how we think about and plan for the increasing diversity of learners in our classrooms and on our campuses.
As UDL initiatives gain ground and momentum across the country, it’s important to share and support initiatives and efforts. For this reason, we have initiated a national scan of UDL in Canadian Higher Ed. We are interested in finding out what “counts” as UDL at different institutions, whether it is related to accessibility services or teaching and learning excellence, whether it is considered familiar and useful, and what kinds of attitudinal shifts are perceived to accompany organizational change around UDL.
The national scan will include three stages: Supporting Systems, Cultural Contexts, and Effective Efforts. The first stage is currently underway – in the form of a survey collecting information about UDL policy, positions, and professional development from volunteer institutions with UDL initiatives.
At this session, we will share the results from stage one so far, solicit participation from additional institutions. We hope that even at the early stage of this national scan, it can play a role in connecting and supporting the emerging community of learners and leaders involved in the disruptive work of UDL!

2. Building Institutional Support for Open Educational Practices
Rajiv Jhangiani
Kwantlen Polytechnic University leads Canada in its embrace of open educational practices. This includes supporting the creation, adaptation, and adoption of open textbooks and other open educational resources through grants and publishing support, training and support for a wide range of open pedagogies and open ed tech tools, and training and support for open education research. KPU currently offers seven zero textbook cost (ZTC) credentials, including the Bachelor of Arts degree in general studies and actively collaborates with institutions across the world, including Montgomery College for an Open Pedagogy Fellowship that focuses on the UN Sustainable Development Goals and with Keene State College for a virtual Open Pedagogy Learning Community.
Open education is woven through each of KPU’s strategic planning documents and is embedded within many of our policies (e.g., intellectual property), procedures (e.g., course development), and practices (e.g., textbook ordering). This brief presentation will draw on our experience and lessons learned to synthesize the 10 most effective strategies that have enabled us to build, grow, and scale institutional support for open educational practices.

3. Carnivals & Camping, Dr. Seuss & Disco Sweats: Professional Development You Can Chew 
Todd Conaway
As part of our faculty learning operation, we have taken thematic digital spaces and bite sized chucking to a whole new level! We discovered that two weeks was too much and one hour is never enough. We created week long courses that focus on short activities to be completed each day. In a loose nod to the infamous #ds106 Daily Create, and framed an exploration of digital assets and uses that combine the supple athletic grace of Richard Simmons and the sublime pedagogies of Dr. Seuss! We have also taken the metaphor of maps and rear-view mirrors to an unwholesome extreme and let loose a neurotic carnival barker in the bear cage.
You don’t need a ticket to get in! Everyone is welcome and everyone can play. Step right up and remix a few mouthfuls of these five-day adventures to fit your carnival goers deep fried appetites.
We have five operational and shareable five-day courses that will be displayed in all their circus like glory. Step right up! Take a bite!
That’s the “trailer.”
The less flowery version is below.
Over the last two years we have created and delivered five “five-day” workouts around digital learning spaces. Each has been themed from bottom to top with stories around carnivals, gym workouts, backpacking, and Dr. Seuss. This lightning session will describe the qualities they had that made them accessible to faculty both in terms of depth, playfulness, and community building. Within this story is a bridge to faculty how they offer the courses they teach both from an aesthetic standpoint and from storytelling within the digital landscape.
 

Speakers
avatar for Todd Conaway

Todd Conaway

Instructional Designer, University of Washington Bothell
Todd Conaway is an Instructional Designer at UW Bothell after ten years of working with faculty as an instructional designer at Yavapai Community College in Arizona. Prior to that, he taught high school English for ten years at a small private school where he was able to combine his... Read More →
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Associate Vice Provost, Open Education, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
avatar for Ruth Fraser

Ruth Fraser

Associate Director Student Affairs and Services, Douglas College
Ruth Fraser is a Student Services administrator, currently working at Douglas College in Vancouver, BC. The focus of her work is to advance accessibility in higher education by changing how we think about and serve students with disabilities. She has 15 years experience in higher... Read More →
avatar for Seanna Takacs

Seanna Takacs

Learning Specialist/Educational Consultant - UDL, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
I am an accessibility specialist, working on bringing the UDL framework to KPU. My background is in literacy, language acquisition, and learning disabilities. People should talk to me about inclusion and diversity, UDL, skepticism about disability categories, mental health, learning... Read More →


Monday May 11, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Ballroom 1

2:05pm

Alternative Assessments
I'm a business administration instructor at Coast Mountain College that teaches Mathematics of Finance and Statistics among other courses. I started with the traditional model of assessment - give traditional written exams part-way and at the end of a course, and use that to determine a final grade. On a lark, I included a bonus question in one of my math exams: Draw a picture about your feelings and math class.

A bright student that performed well in classes and worked hard bombed this test. Her picture was a crying face with the words “anxious, frustrated.” This test, which was a direct application of knowledge, turned out to be a poor proxy for her actual abilities. It got me to consider two follow-up questions: a) Were my traditional exams actual indicators of success in math, and b) was there a way I could assess students to better align with the learning outcomes I was really interested in?

I’m engaging in an experiment in my next semester. I’ll be teaching statistics and I’ll be focused on non-traditional ways to assess my students. Specifically, I’ll be implementing statistics journals, student data-gathering, and the final assessment being a project where students, either individually or in groups, are to use statistical methods to find the solution to a problem and then justify their report in an interview, akin to a thesis defence.

The proposal for this presentation is to answer: why did I engage in alternative assessment in courses with traditionally classic assessments, what did I discover doing this, what were my failures doing it, and how can it be implemented in others’ classrooms? The presentation is intended to be a tell-all of the good and the bad of my alternative assessment journey, which is being done with the support of Coast Mountain College’s Centre of Learning Transformation.


Monday May 11, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Salon D

2:05pm

Eliminating Participation Gender Bias in a Large STEM Course
The loss of students underrepresented in STEM between the first course and subsequent courses is a challenge to academic institutions and is thought to be due, in part, to a lack of identity with the discipline. This presentation describes a collaborative SEISMIC (http://bit.ly/SEISMICProject) research project wherein an anonymous backchannel is introduced in entry-level STEM courses to see if this leads to positive changes in student identity within the course discipline. 

The use of a backchannel in a STEM course has been shown to have a positive effect on the level of participation by female and first-generation students who, when surveyed, professed greater discomfort with verbal questioning. A longitudinal study showed that 97% of students felt that an anonymous backchannel should be offered in all entry-level STEM courses. The study also found that use of the backchannel changed students’ willingness to ask verbal questions in subsequent courses.
Expected Outcomes:
After this session, participants will be able to:
1) Report how the use of an anonymous backchannel affected student participation in a number of cohorts of students underrepresented in STEM disciplines.
2) Discuss the pros and cons of using an anonymous backchannel in entry-level STEM courses.
3) Participate in or promote the backchannel research at their own institutions
Let me know if you have any questions or other next steps!


Speakers
avatar for Perry Samson

Perry Samson

Professor, University of Michigan
I am Professor of Climate Science in the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan and frequently invited speaker on issues of technologies to aid learning. I am an innovator of classroom technologies having co-founded of The Weather Underground, a global website for weather... Read More →


Monday May 11, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Ballroom 3

2:05pm

Coast Mountain College: Experiential, Place-Based Learning
Coast Mountain College’s BHAG (Big Hairy Audacious Goal) is to become the college of choice for experiential, place-based learning by 2027.  With this goal in mind, courses at Coast Mountain College (CMTN) are designed to provide authentic real-world educational experiences. Field schools are an innovative way to provide this type of experience and are regular offerings for many of our science and anthropology programs; but offering field schools in our Faculty of Business was something more unique.
In 2019, Evan Van Dyk transformed two, one-semester-long, 3-credit courses: MGMT 201-Entrepreneurship and MARK 150-Introduction to Marketing into a 17-day, 6-credit, condensed field school called “Opportunities in the Skeena.” With their instructor, students spent two and a half weeks onsite at the North Pacific Cannery Historic Site in Port Edward, at K’san Campground, on the Gitxsan traditional territory, and working with other businesses and non-profits in Terrace and Smithers, BC. Students were tasked with “assessing the challenges that entrepreneurs face while operating businesses in the Skeena region, performing research and assisting in designing strategies to meet the region’s unique needs.”
The decision to transform these courses into a Field School was not just in keeping with the college’s BHAG, it was also to incorporate the principles of Universal Design of Learning (UDL) into the course delivery. Meyer, Rose and Gordon (2014) suggest that students be provided with authentic, real world experiences, opportunities for group collaboration and frequent formative feedback to better reach their academic goals. Another suggested UDL principle, providing multiple means of assessment, was built into the course allowing students to demonstrate their learning through a variety of hands-on and real-world experiences throughout the course.
In this 30-minute workshop, Evan will present the successes and challenges of this field school with a focus on how to transform a regular business course into an experiential, place-based adventure that appeals to learners who need success measured outside of regular classroom situations. Evan will discuss how to condense content, design assignments and assessments to incorporate UDL principles, as well as what he learned working on First Nation’s Lands and with Indigenous Communities.

Meyer, A., Rose, D.H., & Gordon, D. (2014) Universal design for learning: Theory and practice, Wakefield MA: CAST

Speakers
EV

Evan van Dyk

Instructor, Coast Mountain College
avatar for Tracey Woodburn

Tracey Woodburn

Learning Transformation Specialist, Coast Mountain College


Monday May 11, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Ballroom 2

2:35pm

Coffee/Snack
Monday May 11, 2020 2:35pm - 3:00pm
TBA

3:00pm

Long and Drawn Out
Long and Drawn Out.
We double dog dare you to use your educators’ super powers to translate the densest text we could find — a terms and conditions agreement — into a gripping, page-turning, stick figure graphic novel. Are you game to join a team of challengers who will use humble stick figures to convert technical language into teachable moments?

Seriously, that “click here to agree” terms and conditions contract that we routinely skip over contains restrictions on our copyrights and privacy. What would we education professionals do differently if we knew exactly what is — and is not — in the terms and conditions of our education learning management systems, apps, and tools?

We will dig deep into the terms and conditions associated with learning management tools like Blackboard and Turnitin using the fun and successful stick figure visual narrative method from the Life Outside the Box program (a JIBC initiative). This story-telling tool has been used to great success in translating important documents into comic book scenes. You may use this comics-creating method to deeply analyze any technologically complex, emotionally charged, and/or frequently misunderstood readings in your own discipline.

Come and learn how to make long and drawn out documents, like terms and conditions agreements, more accessible and memorable. There will be laughs, gold stars, and a ticking clock. (We pinky swear no art skills are needed — this activity really is stick figure easy!)

Speakers
avatar for Clint Lalonde

Clint Lalonde

Manager, Educational Technologies, BCcampus
Clint Lalonde is an educational technologist and an advocate for the use of open educational resources and open education practices in higher education. Clint has worked in the British Columbia post-secondary system for 20 years, and is currently Manager, Education Technology at... Read More →


Monday May 11, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom 3

3:00pm

Indigenizing through Infusion
Indigenizing the Institution” is a common mandate now for most post-secondary institutions in BC, and with this comes the challenging expectation that faculty will participate in this process by indigenizing their teaching and courses.  This “Indigenizing through Infusion” workshop will help participants to experience, explore and emphasize instructional strategies, resources, and activities that will help them in the process of indigenizing through infusion their classroom environment and their course content.  

The teaching-learning role of the Oral Tradition Circle and Storytelling skills of listening and speaking will be emphasized and incorporated to complement the Western Tradition skills of reading and writing. The topics covered will include acknowledging the First Nations territory with video and written statements, developing community by sharing “Who am I” in terms of name, ancestry and community, and including stories about the history of local landmark names and legends for writing topics .

First, participants will experience classroom activities that explore the value of using locally-sourced videos, written stories, and community-event news articles to introduce Indigenous culture, traditions and history to students. Guided metacognitive reflection questions will be used to help them focus and write about what was interesting and new for them in the videos and/or readings. Once they have their reflections written, the format of the local traditional “Talking Circle” protocol will be used, so they can practice their listening/speaking skills as they share their mindfulness thoughts. The “Teaching Circle” will be used to develop group consciousness and content knowledge through the acknowledgement of each participant’s contribution as they share and record their reflections to create a collaborative brainstorm for content. This group content will be then be used for the beginning steps of the writing process to help participants start writing their own paragraphs and essays.

The workshop will end with participants reflecting on their experiences and how by using these instructional and active learning strategies, learning is encouraged, and the classroom’s learning community is developed. The infusion of the Talking and Teaching Circles with reflection and writing activates will provide participants with the experience of learning within both the Oral Tradition and Western Tradition.

Speakers
LB

Leonne Beebe

Associate Professor, University of the FraserValley
As a literacy/numeracy specialist at the University Fraser Valley and as the Agassiz-Harrison Literacy Co-ordinator, I have taught ESL and both first and second language students upgrading English and math.


Monday May 11, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Salon F

3:00pm

Disrupting the Status Quo of Disengaged Universities and Transforming them into Socially Responsible & Engaged Universities
Disrupting the Status Quo of Disengaged Universities and Transforming them into Socially Responsible & Engaged Universities

The prevalence of socio-economic uncertainty and the rise of cultural insecurity, in recent times, has questioned the value and purpose of universities within their regional, national and international contexts. Increasingly, the commercialization of higher education has led to societal distrust of universities and the important work they do. Therefore, universities all over the world are making efforts to engage with their communities to ‘disrupt’ the misleading notion of being ivory towers and ‘transform’ the way faculties, students and staff interact with their communities for meaningful social impact. More importantly, given the socio-economic scenario, “higher education institutions are [now] at the forefront of change towards an enhanced model of development based on closer industry-government-society relationship” (World University Ranking, 2016). Participants of this talk will develop an understanding of the changing role of higher education in this regard.
Next, this presentation addresses solutions for the pursuit of this ‘enhanced model’, whereby higher education institutions can incorporate community engagement as an important directive in their strategic planning. Universities are seeking ways to firstly, combine academic knowledge and community knowledge to address issues of social disadvantage and secondly, combine university services and community services to maximize social impact by reaching out to members in need of such services. This is a mammoth undertaking - one that requires extension of university membership to communities who otherwise might never engage with the academic world. Therefore, this presentation will address the task ahead for universities in building community partnerships for meaningful social impact and development of its surrounding communities. Using the framework of Service Learning, this presentation will expand on two things, a) how to build equitable and sustainable community partnerships through course design and b) how can universities institutionalize their civic mission. Participants will engage with the difficult question of how faculties can apply their intellectual expertise for community growth by transforming their course design to incorporate community-partnerships through the three models of Service Learning (SL) – Pure SL, Disciplined-based SL and Problem-Based SL and build capacity for social responsibility within various disciplines.

Speakers
avatar for Ayesha Mushtaq

Ayesha Mushtaq

Instructor, Dalhousie University Halifax
Ms. Mushtaq’s expertise is in educational leadership, curriculum development and international education in global contexts. Ms. Mushtaq’s doctoral work is in Educational Leadership with a focus on curriculum internationalization in higher education.


Monday May 11, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Salon D

3:00pm

Interdisciplinary Panel: Liberal Arts Infused Education
When students are worried about artificial intelligence taking over and that there are no jobs for liberal arts grads, it is easy to question the value of teaching and learning within the traditions of the humanities and social sciences. Yet an education infused with a liberal arts tradition has deep historical roots in educating innovators and creators – something that higher education today is being challenged to produce. A liberal arts education is where divergent thinking can be fostered and it is only through divergent thinking that students will be able to robot-proof their careers. This interdisciplinary panel will share the results of a year long project where faculty came together to talk and reflect on their practice, explore co-teaching, define experiential learning, discuss the application of teaching and learning strategies they cherish, and explore how best to ensure graduates are future ready while at the same time preserving disciplinary practices. The panel will begin by outlining a variety of projects they have engaged in over the year. They will share their reflections of coming together with intention to talk about teaching. And they will explore both the opportunities and tensions that surfaced as they attempted to engage in the scholarship of teaching and learning, as well as consider next-generation teaching strategies. Participants will be encouraged to share their own reflections and to ask questions. The aim of this session is to open a dialogue between interdisciplinary faculty, and teaching and learning educators around establishing a praxis that supports student learning in an age of disruption.

Speakers

Monday May 11, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom 2

3:00pm

Supporting Students with Disabilities in BC Post-Secondary
The Supporting Students with Disabilities in BC Postsecondary course invites faculty and staff to closely examine how the learning environment can create barriers for students with disabilities and consider applying easy-to-use strategies that can transform our campuses so they are inclusive for all students, including those with disabilities.
The objective of this session is to showcase the SSWD course and resource site and explain how the open resource can be utilized by instructors and staff at post-secondary schools throughout BC to strengthen their ability to apply intentional, inclusive practices to support students with disabilities in their learning and paths to success.
Example learning outcomes SSWD Course:
· Define what is meant by having a disability and become familiar with a wide range of disabilities and how they impact learning
· Identify the concepts of duty to accommodate and understand the process of reasonable accommodation
· Apply strategies and tools from Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to create an inclusive learning environment to accommodate your students
· Develop personal goals, address institution-wide responsibilities and identify next steps for creating inclusive campuses
· Recognize the range of learners and learning styles present in their classrooms linked to different types of disabilities, and consider this in relation to teaching, learning, and evaluation practices
· Apply tools to assess the learning environment given the diversity of learners
· Consider options for flexible teaching and evaluation methods that accommodate a variety of learning needs (ie. Universal Design for Learning)
·  Discuss how the website can be used by faculty and staff at post-secondary schools throughout BC

Speakers
MK

Mary Kallberg

Senior Manager, Student Learning Support and Disability Resources


Monday May 11, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom 1

4:00pm

Interior and North Connect Event
If you are registering from an institution from the interior or the north, you will be sent an invitation to this event. Please reply so we know to expect you.  

If you are attending the Festival from an institution from the interior or northern British Columbia please join us for a time of connecting with colleagues in regionally similar institutions to discuss how each institution incorporates open education, learning & teaching, and education technology. Appetizers will be provided by BCcampus.


Speakers
avatar for Carolee Clyne

Carolee Clyne

Open Education Advisor, BC Campus/University of Northern British Columbia
Carolee has been supporting faculty in higher education for over 20 years in a variety of roles including computer, library systems, web support, instructional design and registrar systems. Modeling life long learning, Carolee is presently a Doctoral candidate at the University of... Read More →
avatar for Ross McKerlich

Ross McKerlich

Open Education Advisor, Regional Representative, Interior, BCcampus


Monday May 11, 2020 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Tuscany

4:15pm

Childcare Closes
Monday May 11, 2020 4:15pm - 4:30pm

4:20pm

Field Trip: TBA
Monday May 11, 2020 4:20pm - 5:30pm
Hotel Foyer

4:30pm

Field Trip: TBA
Monday May 11, 2020 4:30pm - 5:40pm
Hotel Foyer

4:40pm

Field Trip: TBA
Monday May 11, 2020 4:40pm - 5:50pm
Hotel Foyer
 
Tuesday, May 12
 

7:00am

Registration Opens
Tuesday May 12, 2020 7:00am - 7:00am
TBA

7:30am

Networking Breakfast
Networking Topics and Groups:
1. Adult Basic Education (ABE)
2. Librarians
3. Educational Technologies Users Group (ETUG)
4. Book Club
5. Facilitating Learning Online (FLO)

Tuesday May 12, 2020 7:30am - 8:45am
Harbourfront Ballrooms

7:30am

Breakfast
Tuesday May 12, 2020 7:30am - 9:00am
Harbourfront Ballrooms

8:00am

Fit Break
Speakers
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Advisor, Teaching & Learning and Researcher, Open Education Practices, BCCampus


Tuesday May 12, 2020 8:00am - 8:30am

8:30am

Childcare Opens
Tuesday May 12, 2020 8:30am - 9:00am

9:00am

Keynote - Kevin Lamoureux
Speakers
KL

Kevin Lamoureux

University of Winnipeg


Tuesday May 12, 2020 9:00am - 10:15am
Harbourfront Ballrooms

10:15am

Coffee/Snack
Tuesday May 12, 2020 10:15am - 10:45am
TBA

10:45am

Lightning Session
1. Indigenous Perspectives in a First-year Astronomy Course – One Settler’s Search 
Jennifer Kirkey 
Astronomy is literally universal. The introduction to astronomy course for liberal arts major is a staple lab science course in virtually every institute of higher education in this province. I have been using an adapted version of OpenStax Astronomy for about five years now. Including indigenous perspectives in the book and in my teaching has been a focus (pun intended) for me throughout this adaption. As an eight-generation settler raised in the middle of Turtle Island, it has been a challenge to not perpetuate cultural appropriation while sharing resources. This lightning session will give you a fast tour of what resources are available with a Coast Salish and other British Columbia First Nations emphasis as well as outlining my journey to find them with tips to start finding your own.
As an example, I hope to see you at the local Hobiyee celebration on February 28 and 29 2020 at the PNE in Vancouver. <http://www.tsamiks.com/hoobiyee-2020.html> This is the Nisga’a New Year <http://www.nisgaanation.ca/news/hobiyee> and their Government holds a great celebration where everyone is welcome.
Being able to adapt resources to local perspectives is one of them most powerful aspects of OER. The OpenStax Astronomy book <https://openstax.org/details/books/astronomy> is a beautiful, classic textbook whose head writer is very respected in the field. It is also very focused on the United States of America. The adapted book has started to disrupt that narrative. It is now full of references to Canadian science, Canadian astronauts, Canadian science. <https://pressbooks.bccampus.ca/astronomy1105/> Special thanks to BCcampus for funding a student to help make graphics for this book. The cultural and historical perspectives now include many different cultures, with some local First Nations, and I continue my search to respectfully include more. This session will outline some of what I have found and give you some ideas on how to start, or continue, your own journey.

2. Learning Transformed: Open Educational Technology as a Social Good 
Ian Linkletter
The Faculty of Education at UBC has developed a new strategic plan entitled Learning Transformed, and the first priority is the “advancement of education as a social good”. This lightning talk will centre around how the Faculty of Education has employed open source learning technology to benefit society, and the opportunities ahead. Participants will develop an understanding of how open technology can promote:
  • Learning equality
  • Open learning
  • Collaboration
The talk will conclude with a call to action around how to get involved with OpenETC, an open educational technology cooperative dedicated to making technology accessible to all.

3. Disrupting Assessment Weightings in Course Outlines 
Trent Tucker
A couple of years ago I came across James Lang's piece in The Chronicle entitled “How Much Do You Want Your Final to Count?”. I finally worked up the courage to try this approach myself in a Business Analytics course this past Fall Term. Students tried their hand at a couple of individual and a couple of team assessments. They were given information about the capstone project and a prior year's final exam. Once they had received feedback (and grades of course) on those initial assessments, they got to choose the weights — within pre-set ranges — for their work for the entire term! If they wanted to weight their final exam at 26%, that's fine. If they wanted to weight it at 34% — that's fine too. If they wanted to stick with the default grading scheme I designed for them — again that's fine. Had too much fun at Homecoming and missed a homework assignment? Weight it lower. Picked a great team and worked awesomely together? Weight it higher. Assessment weightings in Course Outlines are usually set by the instructor and convey their thoughts about the relative importance of the various assessments as indicated by the weights. This approach give students the ability to set the importance based on their own criteria and play to their strengths and reduce the impact where they may be weaker.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Kirkey

Jennifer Kirkey

Douglas College
I have been teaching physics and astronomy for more than 25 years at the community college level. I do outreach to elementary schools. I became an advocate for open textbooks about five years ago.
avatar for Ian Linkletter

Ian Linkletter

Learning Technology Specialist, University of British Columbia
Ian is the Faculty of Education's Learning Technology Specialist. He helps instructors integrate technology with their teaching in effective, evidence-based, and innovative ways. Ian specializes in distance education and is the Project Manager of the Reconciliation Through Indigenous... Read More →
avatar for Trent Tucker

Trent Tucker

Senior Lecturer, Thompson Rivers University
I've taught big classes (880+ students), small classes (10-ish) in traditional universities (Laurier, Waterloo, Guelph, TRU), and non-traditional (QuestU). I like trying new pedagogical stuff in the classroom.


Tuesday May 12, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Ballroom 1

10:45am

Disrupting English Academic Texts with Multilingual Relational Texts
As part of my Educational Technology Fellowship sponsored by BCcampus, I am disrupting the conventional approach of using English, academic text-based forms of instruction by applying an intervention using multilingual, technology-based forms for engaging students–specifically videos and podcasts–in online and blended learning environments. My research is based on the hypothesis that narrative-based videos and podcasts, as relational 'texts' for teaching and learning through storytelling, provide opportunities for embodied ways of knowing (that encourage the expression of one's whole self) and for supporting students and teachers in building relationships of trust and mutual respect. This approach, which aligns with principles of decolonization, can potentially support more diverse, equal and inclusive learning environments. Building on my relationship with the Emily Carr University of Art + Design (ECUAD), where I have been a sessional faculty member since 2012 , my action research involves case studies in undergraduate courses–blended and online–at ECUAD. I am collaborating with teaching faculty, and working with them to integrate participatory video and podcast creation into their classes in a way that will enable us to provide evidence-based results while supporting the overall teaching and learning goals of each course. While this research will focus on 'diversity' and 'inclusion' in terms of cultural diversity, consideration will be given to the ways that other equity-seeking groups respond to the research intervention. This research project aims to support a kind of student learning and success that goes beyond academic performance to develop essential life skills that can support students in becoming critical and creative agents in their own lives and communities.

In this session, I will present the initial findings of my research, showcase some students' videos and podcasts from the project, and engage session participants in a lively form of media analysis as a catalyst for discussion.




Tuesday May 12, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Salon D

10:45am

‘Uy’ skweyul (Good Day in Hul’q’umi’num’): Indigneous Pedagogy Conversations
‘Uy’ skweyul (Good Day in Hul’q’umi’num’)
As an Indigenous staff person at a post-secondary institution I have had the honour of facilitating and attending workshops, meetings and events around engaging in reconciliation, Indigenous pedagogy, Indigenization in our teaching and learning practices and decolonization of our institution.

This is a safe space to ask those hard uncomfortable questions. We will start with a brief history of Indigenous Canada because how do we know where we are going if we don't know where we come from? What it is to be Indigenous in a colonial system and how do I find my space? How can we support decolonization of our class and institutions when by foundation that is how they work? What is indigenous pedagogy considering there are many different Indigenous groups and cultures? how to be a good ally and commonly asked questions. After the presentation there will be time for questions and comments.

Speakers

Tuesday May 12, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Salon F

10:45am

OERs Are Not Just for Students: Transforming Curriculum Design through OER Creation
OERs Are Not Just for Students: Transforming Curriculum Design through OER Creation

In May of 2019, Thompson Rivers University (TRU) offered its first version of a week-long course (re)design workshop. Recognizing we had been primarily using resources from other institutions, we opted to create resources specific to TRU through a one-day facilitated writing sprint. We believed that a one-day sprint would be sufficient to create a few course design resources that TRU faculty could use, both for face-to-face and online course creation and revision.

But we were wrong.

The project grew from being conceptualized as a few stand-alone documents to being imagined as a large online open educational resource. The benefits of OERs for students have been investigated (Hendricks, Reinsberg, & Rieger, 2017; Jhangiani et al, 2018), but they are still relatively unstudied for faculty use. Moving beyond offering resources simply for course design, we decided to create an OER that encompasses three main areas of curriculum planning and design: composition, mapping, and alignment of learning outcomes at the course, program, and institutional levels; choice and alignment of instructional strategies and learning activities; and alignment of outcomes assessment at all levels. We divided into three teams and got to work. After several planning meetings and full-day working sessions, we are nearly ready to release the resource into the world, just in time for TRU’s 2020 Course Renovation Institute.

In this session, we will outline our goals for and process of creating the OER and faculty’s perceptions of its usability from the course design workshop. As well, we will demonstrate the OER, and session participants will have an opportunity to explore its various features. By the end of the session, participants will be able to do the following:
• Articulate the value of OERs for faculty use
• Access the open educational resource with their own device(s)
• Explore the features of the resource
• Assess the value of the resource for their own contexts
• Share the resource with others from their own institutions, if desired

The session is relevant to the theme because the resource—as both open access and creative commons—has the potential to both disrupt and transform how course design and curriculum planning happens both within TRU and in other institutions that may choose to adopt this resource for their own use.

Participants are encouraged to bring their devices to this session so they can peruse the resource.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Ives

Carolyn Ives

Coordinator, Learning and Faculty Development -Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching, Thompson Rivers University
Carolyn Ives is a faculty member in the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT) at Thompson Rivers University. A former English professor, her work shifted to educational development in recent years through her roles as Academic Integrity Officer and then Curriculum... Read More →
avatar for Catharine Dishke Hondzel

Catharine Dishke Hondzel

Thompson Rivers University
avatar for Kara Loy

Kara Loy

Associate Director, Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching, Thompson Rivers University
Kara Loy holds an MEd in educational research (University of Calgary), a BA Hons in English, a BA in Spanish, and a post graduate TESL certificate (Teaching English as a Subsequent Language, University of Saskatchewan). She is pursuing a doctoral degree in educational leadership (University... Read More →
avatar for Brenna Clarke Gray

Brenna Clarke Gray

Educational Technologist, TRU Open Learning
Brenna Clarke Gray is an educational technologist by day and a comics scholar by night. She writes on representations of Canada in American comic books and the failings of the Canadian academy in equal measure. You can find her on Twitter: @brennacgray.
MS

Matthew Stranach

Coordinator, Educational Technologies; TRU Open Learning, Thompson Rivers University
Matthew Stranach is Coordinator, Educational Technologies with TRU’s Open Learning Division. Matt has been an educator in higher education for more than 10 years. He holds a Doctorate in Educational Technology from the University of Calgary, and a Master’s degree in Instructional... Read More →
NJ

Nina Johnson

Thompson Rivers University
Nina Johnson is a literature and creative writing instructor in the English and Modern Languages Department at Thompson Rivers University. She is a certified Veriditas Labyrinth Facilitator and a member of The Labyrinth Society Research Committee. As a Senior Lecturer and TRU Teaching... Read More →


Tuesday May 12, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Ballroom 2

10:45am

BCcampus Indigenization Guides
Speakers
DG

Denise Goudy

Director, Collaborative Projects, BCcampus, BCcampus
With over 20 years experience in BC\'s post-secondary system, I have been involved in policy, process, and practice as it pertains to delivery of academic education. I am passionate about access, quality experiences and the value of open in both teaching and learning.


Tuesday May 12, 2020 10:45am - 12:05pm
Tuscany

10:45am

Experiential Activities and Student Safety
This workshop will explore the purposeful, culturally and personally safe use of experiential learning activities post secondary classrooms.    Activities can take the form of ice-breakers, energizers while also being used as instructional strategies for teaching concepts and providing opportunities for reflection and skill development. The material presented is intended to be used in a typical post secondary classroom as an important augmentation to more traditional instructional strategies and also as central way of engaging students to meet specific course objectives.
Incorporating experiential activities comes with challenges both for students and faculty in a post secondary classroom. Students may be reluctant to take personal risks; they may minimize the relevance of experiential learning or simply feel they are too grown up to play games in class and are too self conscious to participate in role playing activities. Faculty may feel that activities take away from the importance of knowledge transfer and may also feel that they are imposing personal risks on students. Some risk taking or stepping outside of one’s comfort zone is essential to all learning, yet genuine concern about student safety with regards to personal disclosure or looking foolish among peers should be included in lesson planning and delivery. For some, play is seen as frivolous; our workshop seeks to disrupt that notion.
To that end, this workshop will explore specific activities and approaches that may mitigate some of these safety concerns and will provide powerful opportunities for social engagement and reflective learning. Key points we will address are that the reflection is the most important part of the experiential learning activity and that the lesson strategies we will cover can be presented and processed in a variety of different ways with a variety of different outcomes.
Participants can expect to come away from the workshop with easy-to-implement tools and activities for active learning engagement with a renewed approach to using experiential learning in safe and meaningful ways. Some of the strategies we will cover are the use of metaphors, challenge by choice, and respect for student diversity. Working with a variety of personal comfort zones will be explored.

Speakers
avatar for Jay Goddard

Jay Goddard

Human Service Program Coordinator, Faculty of Human, Social and Educational Development, Thompson Rivers University


Tuesday May 12, 2020 10:45am - 12:05pm
Ballroom 3

10:45am

“So you want to develop a ZTC?”
“So you want to develop a ZTC?”

Curious about how to build a Zero Textbook Cost (ZTC) program in at your institution? This session is for you! We will share how BCcampus defines ZTCs, how to pursue one and learn about the steps to achieving this goal – you may be closer than you think!

In this panel and interactive session, you will learn how ZTCs were built and launched in BC post-secondary institutes; the role of the library; how ZTCs can support accessibility and inclusivity initiatives; and, next steps you can take to develop ZTC programs. The session will include a Liberating Structure activity to help attendees start on the path toward a ZTC.

This session will be led by librarians, faculty and BCcampus project managers who have worked on ZTC programs across a variety of disciplines.

This session will address the following topics and lessons learned:

- Financial implications for development and sustainability
- Administration (information gathering, communication, maintenance)
- Identifying what programs may be good candidates
- How to get faculty engaged and on board
- Barriers/challenges that ZTC projects can face and some tips for overcoming them.
- Considerations for accessibility and inclusivity
- How BCcampus can support ZTC projects

Speakers
avatar for Melanie Meyers

Melanie Meyers

Project Manager, BCcampus


Tuesday May 12, 2020 10:45am - 12:05pm
Salon E

11:15am

Transition
Tuesday May 12, 2020 11:15am - 11:35am
TBA

11:35am

Increasing Field Experience Access with Virtual Reality
Field trips are valuable experiential learning opportunities for students in natural sciences. They reinforce key concepts and, more importantly, generate enthusiasm for students to further explore these disciplines (Boyle et al., 2007). Unfortunately, access to field experiences can be limited by many barriers, such as mobility issues, financial constraints and time limitations. Virtual reality (VR) technologies provide a means to increase access by allowing students to participate in ways that are not otherwise possible. Adopting these technologies requires that faculty and institutions make significant time and money commitments. Additionally, although there is an increasing amount of research that shows the cognitive benefits of VR and other technology-enable field trips (e.g. Bursztn et al., 2015; Ibanez and Delgado-Kloos, 2018), there has been no work looking at the impact different types of VR have on affective learning benefits (e.g. interest, motivation, etc.). This presentation will address both of these issues by: 1) outlining a framework to help guide decision-making for any faculty interested in using VR; and 2) comparing evidence of affective learning gains of VR field trips to traditional field trips. Demographic analysis of these data suggest that certain minority groups benefit more from the increased access that VR field trips provide compared to traditional field trips.

Speakers
DT

Derek Turner

Douglas College


Tuesday May 12, 2020 11:35am - 12:05pm
Salon D

11:35am

Digital Delivery Instruction and Remote Indigenous Communities
Research highlights both the need and the benefits of distance education for rural and remote Indigenous communities. The first need arises from demands to find innovative ways to meet the educational needs of a growing and young Indigenous population, who often live in rural and remote parts of the country.
Because many Indigenous people live far from urban centres that offer an array of options for those wishing to pursue post secondary education, access to a quality education has been a challenge for many Indigenous people and communities situated in rural and remote regions. Digital delivery instruction [DDI] has been touted by researchers and community leaders as one way to serve this growing, and increasingly young population (Ambler, 2004; Assembly of First Nations, 2010a, 2010b; Beaton & Carpenter, 2014; Fahy, Steel, & Martin, 2009; Sisco, 2010).
By creating educational options that allow Indigenous people to stay in their home community, distance learning can contribute to the long-term sustainability of their communities (Beaton & Carpenter, 2014).
Closely related to promoting sustainable communities, DDI options can also support efforts by Indigenous nations to ensure their constitutionally recognized rights to self-determination and control over what happens on their traditional lands are maintained in the face of governments that have historically sought to undermine these rights.
The AFN (2010a, 2010b), for example, has argued that the importance of post-secondary education and skills training for First Nations youth and adults should not only meet the economic needs and economic aspirations of individuals, but should also contribute to the capacity for nation building required to foster strong First Nations governance and cultural revitalization.
The Centre for Teaching & Learning at the College of New Caledonia undertook a project to bring DDI to the Cheslatta Carrier Nation Community in Northern BC. Come hear what we learned about the possibilities for that as well as the growth we experienced in better understanding “indigenizing education.”

Speakers

Tuesday May 12, 2020 11:35am - 12:05pm
Salon F

11:35am

Mental Health and Wellness Initiative at the University of Victoria
In my session, I will share with participants an exciting new mental-health and wellness initiative that I launched at the University of Victoria in October 2019. UVic Bounce (www.uvic.ca/bounce) is an initiative that provides critical early-stage resources to support student mental health and to help students thrive. Through videos in which alumni and faculty speak openly about their successes and failures during their own university experiences, students are able to reframe their struggles and challenges as a normal and important part of their university experience. By normalizing and de-stigmatizing conversations about the difficulties that students face and by disrupting the discourse of success that tends to shame students and keep them isolated, UVic Bounce hopes to make it easier for students to share their struggles and to seek the support that they need. Our stories connect us and can transform our university communities. Faculty member's participation in this initiative is particularly disruptive and transformative; by sharing personal challenges from their own university days through this intimate video series, faculty members disrupt narratives of shame and help students to understand that the difficulties they face are not meant to be faced alone and that they are a part of compassionate community who supports them.

At the 2018 BC Campus "Festival of Learning," I presented a session ("Learning to Bounce: Teaching Resilience in the Undergraduate Classroom") in which I shared the work that I had been doing since 2014 to build UVic Bounce. Now that this initiative has launched, I would value the opportunity to share this initiative more widely with those working in higher education in BC so that they might be able to build similar initiatives on their own campuses. Campuses must transform to meet the needs of students who are experiencing unprecedented levels of stress, anxiety, and depression related to everything from moving away from home, to academic pressures, to social expectations. Without intervention, the weight can be overwhelming and can lead to anxiety, depression, and other mental health conditions that can negatively affect academic performance.

Universities have the opportunity to intervene at an early stage to help prevent crisis-level mental health conditions by changing the way we understand and talk to students about the struggles they face. If we create a community of support that includes _all_ members of the university community, we can help students before they become overwhelmed, and build positive coping skills that will change the course of their academic journey.

Speakers
RG

Rebecca Gagan

Rebecca Gagan is an Assistant Teaching Professor in the Department of English at The University of Victoria.


Tuesday May 12, 2020 11:35am - 12:05pm
Ballroom 2

12:05pm

Lunch
Tuesday May 12, 2020 12:05pm - 1:15pm
Harbourfront Ballrooms

12:30pm

Fit Break
Speakers
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Advisor, Teaching & Learning and Researcher, Open Education Practices, BCCampus


Tuesday May 12, 2020 12:30pm - 1:00pm

12:30pm

Guided Meditation
Speakers
avatar for Mary Burgess

Mary Burgess

Executive Director, BCcampus
Open Education, Teaching and Learning, Educational Technology, Leadership, organizational change...


Tuesday May 12, 2020 12:30pm - 1:00pm

1:15pm

Opening a Classroom
This is the story of an open education project--but not in the current sense of “open education”. It is about opening a classroom and in doing so, opening oneself up to being observed, evaluated, supported, and inspired.

It is also about opening and expanding our thinking with respect to a practice that is well-established in many higher education institutions: the practice of peer review of teaching. Formative peer review of teaching is a process which often involves the observation of classroom teaching by a peer; the ensuing conversations are usually rich in detail and foster self-reflection and insights into teaching (Gosling, 2014; Thomson, Bell & Hendry, 2015).

This session describes a collaboration between a faculty member, John Vigna, and an educational developer, Isabeau Iqbal. We tell the story of how John's “crazy” idea piqued Isabeau's interest and they decided to challenge the usual (i.e., infrequent) ways of doing peer review of teaching. We affectionately dubbed this project “The PRT Marathon”.

The primary purpose of the project was to invigorate and re-energize John's teaching by having as many visitors come to his classroom over a single term and engage in peer review of teaching. Visitors were faculty members from within the same Creative Writing department as John and faculty members in other disciplines, particularly Science. All of them voluntarily engaged in the process.

The secondary, possibly more covert purpose of the project was to shift the departmental culture of teaching. Specifically, John hoped this initiative might encourage colleagues in the Department of Creative Writing to benefit from the value of opening up their classrooms and collaborating on the craft of teaching and the practical application of pedagogy.

Session purpose and objectives:

This session describes why and how we disturbed and challenged a “traditional” practice used to assess and evaluate teaching in higher education.

Session objectives:
1. To prompt reflection among instructors on how they might continue to meet their own needs for professional growth in teaching

2. To ignite discussion about how the “peer review of teaching marathon” might be modified in the participants’ context

Speakers
avatar for Isabeau Iqbal

Isabeau Iqbal

Educational Developer, University of British Columbia
Isabeau consults with instructors on teaching and learning matters, facilitates processes and workshops designed to improve teaching and student learning in higher education, and is involved with various formative peer review of teaching initiatives at the University of British Columbia... Read More →
avatar for John Vigna

John Vigna

Instructor, University of British Columbia


Tuesday May 12, 2020 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Ballroom 2

1:15pm

Transforming Teaching Practices with Innovative Open Pedagogy
“Open pedagogy uses OER as a jumping-off point for remaking our
courses so that they become not just repositories for content, but platforms for learning, collaboration, and engagement with the world outside the classroom” (DeRosa & Robison, 2017, p. 117).

With support from the Open Educational Resources (OER) grants program and Digital Publishing, SFU instructors in the humanities are transforming their teaching practice through innovative and open pedagogy. Using open source publishing platforms such as Open Journal Systems (OJS) and Omeka, several instructors have recently developed engaging and meaningful course projects which invite students to add their voices to the scholarly conversation and make a contribution to public knowledge. Involving students in open content creation and publishing offers new alternatives to traditional “disposable assignments” that “add no value to the world – after a student spends three hours creating it, a teacher spends 30 minutes grading it, and then the student throws it away” (Wiley, 2013). Classroom projects to develop open course journals, databases and exhibits can empower students as active contributors (rather than passive consumers) to the “public marketplace of ideas” (DeRosa & Robison, 2017, p. 122).

This presentation will introduce and explore case-study examples of open publishing projects from several humanities courses at SFU. Hear from librarians, students and course instructors about their experiences in this area, and participate in discussions around key opportunities, challenges, outcomes, and next steps for transforming teaching and learning via open pedagogy.

Speakers
KS

Kate Shuttleworth

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Simon Fraser University
avatar for Hope Power

Hope Power

Teaching & Learning Librarian, Simon Fraser University


Tuesday May 12, 2020 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Ballroom 3

1:15pm

GROW Coaching Model
I’m not sure I’m really reaching my students. I don’t know how to make sure they are learning what I want them to learn. More than half of my class failed the midterm and I don’t know why. My course evaluations aren’t good and I don’t know how to improve. As educators, we often struggle alone with instructional challenges. We might even feel some shame that we aren’t able to solve our own problems.

At BCcampus, we have been using coaching as a way of helping each other work through challenges. Developing curiosity about our colleagues’ challenges enables us to offer support while helping them to grow and learn. Our natural tendency is often to default to advice giving or providing solutions. As much as this might help in the moment, it doesn’t allow for self-reflection and finding our own solutions with future challenges (Hunt & Weintraub, 2016).

Come and experience something that has disrupted and transformed our workplace culture and even our personal lives. In this session, participants will learn about using questions as a way of supporting colleagues’ growth through John Witmore’s GROW model. The GROW model is an easy way to introduce coaching by using the framework to identify and set goals (G), reflect on the current reality (R), revisit options and opportunities (O), and set out with a plan that will (W) be done to achieve goals (Whitmore, 2009).

Participants will then have an opportunity to practice this new learning in a facilitated coaching circle in which instructional challenges are brought forward and, peers offer reflective questions to peers to find solutions (Hunt & Weintraub, 2016).

Learning outcomes:
Describe the GROW coaching model
Develop an understanding of communicative learning through coaching
Develop curious about their own process of problem solving
Develop an understanding of the benefits of peer coaching
Help others learn through a reflective practice

Speakers
avatar for Mary Burgess

Mary Burgess

Executive Director, BCcampus
Open Education, Teaching and Learning, Educational Technology, Leadership, organizational change...
avatar for Robynne Devine

Robynne Devine

Project Manger, Collaborative Projects, BCcampus


Tuesday May 12, 2020 1:15pm - 2:35pm
Salon D

1:15pm

Hits and Misses – Common themes in Accessible Learning programs across the province
Using Liberating Structures, we will facilitate the group in sharing hits and misses and finding solutions to meet the needs of our diverse population of students.  We will use this time to collaborate province-wide.  Through this collaborative process you will fill your toolkits to take back to your campus to use throughout the upcoming year.
 
Hits: What are some successful experiences you had in programming or teaching this year?

Misses: What areas are difficult at this time in your programming or teaching?


Speakers
avatar for Kathy O'Donnell

Kathy O'Donnell

Dept Chair/Faculty, North Island College
avatar for Liz Girard

Liz Girard

Instructor - Department of Accessible Learning, North Island College


Tuesday May 12, 2020 1:15pm - 2:35pm
Tuscany

1:15pm

H5P Workshop
Used by educators all over the world, H5P is a quick-to-learn tool for building interactives for formative assessments like quizzes, matching games, unit reviews, and more. Interactives built in H5P are open access, easy to reuse, and designed with both accessibility and academic integrity in mind. They’re also highly portable and can be plugged into most existing Learning Management Systems, as well as WordPress and Pressbooks. And better than all of this: it’s super fun to use.
This BYOD workshop is intended for anyone interested in using H5P to work collaboratively to build new interactives for their own classroom teaching or instructional support needs. Options to author in Wordpress or Pressbooks will be offered to participants, and support will be provided for those who wish to work within their existing LMS. If you’re new to the possibilities of H5P, an introductory tutorial will be provided; if you have some familiarity already, you’ll be encouraged and supported to try out one of the H5P offerings you’ve never worked with before. In addition to lots of hands-on development time, participants will engage in a robust discussion about using H5P effectively, including:
- considerations of accessibility, universal design, and authoring on the web;
- best practices for the use and design of H5P interactives; and
- advice for finding and adapting open-access content for use in your interactives.
All participants will leave the session with at least two finished H5P interactives and a clear understanding of how to download, save, reuse, and integrate their builds into their preferred online learning spaces. Participants will also be encouraged to practice authoring in H5P in at least two different environments.

Speakers
avatar for Brenna Clarke Gray

Brenna Clarke Gray

Educational Technologist, TRU Open Learning
Brenna Clarke Gray is an educational technologist by day and a comics scholar by night. She writes on representations of Canada in American comic books and the failings of the Canadian academy in equal measure. You can find her on Twitter: @brennacgray.


Tuesday May 12, 2020 1:15pm - 4:00pm
Salon F

1:15pm

Indigenous Pedagogies and Shifting Perspectives
At its best, the language of academia can be thought –provoking. At its worst, it can be very confusing. Words like decolonization, settler identity, indigenization, resurgence, and many others have been in the academic parlance in the past 10 years. But what do they mean; where do they apply; how are they lived, represented, embodied?
This workshop will invite attendees to explore language and the ways in which we utilize words to represent who we are, and to reflect on ways in which we can engage in meaningful conversation about the shared responsibilities we hold as citizens of this country. Through Indigenous pedagogies, we will explore ways in which we can learn to shift perspectives, unlearn, and re-frame our distorted understandings of the world, and of the words we have inherited to talk about, describe, and teach about Indigenous people.


Tuesday May 12, 2020 1:15pm - 4:00pm
Salon E

1:45pm

Transition
Tuesday May 12, 2020 1:45pm - 2:05pm
TBA

2:05pm

Active Learning for Real-World Inquiry
Active Learning for Real-World Inquiry
Doug Hamilton, Elizabeth Childs, Devina Dandar, Rick Kool
Royal Roads University


This interactive session is for instructors interested in developing engaging and relevant strategies to support students who are learning how to do applied research. As technology changes rapidly, undergraduate and graduate students are faced with unique challenges in developing information and research literacy skills that can be used in applied research projects. The purpose of this session is to support instructors in using active learning strategies to help students to overcome the fear of doing research; to systematically and thoughtfully plan their studies; to access meaningful resources from library services; to develop a viable support system for their research; and to think about how to maximize the impact of their research findings. Active learning refers to “instructional strategies involving students in doing things and thinking about what they are doing” (Bonwell and Eison, 1991). According to Meyers and Jones (1993), “active learning has two basic assumptions: (1) that learning is by nature an active endeavor and (2) that different people learn in different ways”. Attendees of this session will explore student learning needs specific to the research process, learn about different ways that active learning strategies and resources can be used in teaching research concepts and methods, and share their own experiences in teaching and learning about research. The session will conclude with an overview of a new OER book that the presenters are developing that is collecting and curating time-tested active learning resources, tips, and strategies from faculty members teaching applied research using an active learning approach.

Speakers

Tuesday May 12, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Ballroom 1

2:05pm

Overcoming Barriers to Open Education in Northern and Interior BC
Open education can be considered disruptive and if fully embraced open education can be transformational for the institution and the communities they serve. Like any change that is worthwhile the journey to transformation is a challenge. Every institution is different, and every institution faces different obstacles and barriers along the path to transformation.  

It takes a team to navigate an open education initiative and in June 2019 BC Campus announced that they would invest in two regional representatives to advise and support open education initiatives in the northern and interior institutions of British Columbia. In October Carolee Clyne (North) and Ross McKerlich (Interior) were hired.

In this 30-minute interactive session hear stories from institutions from the northern and interior regions of British Columbia, learn about common barriers to open education in institutions regardless of what size or where they are located, and also how to get around these barriers together so that lives and communities can be transformed. The overall learning goal is to provide participants with valuable insight on possible solutions suitable to their own community needs for transformation. Through a combination of small group and large group discussion, participants will be actively involved in their learning.

Speakers
avatar for Ross McKerlich

Ross McKerlich

Open Education Advisor, Regional Representative, Interior, BCcampus
avatar for Carolee Clyne

Carolee Clyne

Open Education Advisor, BC Campus/University of Northern British Columbia
Carolee has been supporting faculty in higher education for over 20 years in a variety of roles including computer, library systems, web support, instructional design and registrar systems. Modeling life long learning, Carolee is presently a Doctoral candidate at the University of... Read More →


Tuesday May 12, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Ballroom 3

2:05pm

Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment
In the summer of 2019 Lethbridge College’s Buchanan Library underwent a dramatic transformation with a focus on creating a more inclusive learning environment for students, faculty, and staff. The main goals of the redesign were:
a) To create an environment that meets the diverse needs of the institution’s learners
b) The bringing together of the Centre for Teaching, Learning, and Innovation’s (CTLI) services in a central location
c) A more inclusive environment with considerations to indigenization and accessibility needs
d) The introduction of emerging technology (3D printing, virtual reality, etc.) to the space as learning tools for students

Throughout the planning process the project leads worked to consult stakeholders on their desires and needs in a common learning space. This was done through surveying students, demonstrations, prototypes, and feedback from the wider college community through engagement sessions. The team also visited institutions across the country for inspiration and lessons learned.

We will speak specifically to the consultation process with our indigenous elders who assisted in design considerations and bestowed a Blackfoot name onto the space as part of the campus wide indigenization plan.

The efforts to increase access to technology will be highlighted, including digital signage, the virtual reality study lab, and the movable makerspace cart for student creations.

Attention will be given to highlighting the challenges in disrupting a higher education service steeped in tradition. This includes addressing change anxiety amongst staff, faculty, and students.

Speakers
avatar for Kyle Snowdon

Kyle Snowdon

Senior Manager - Library and Digital Learning
avatar for Jackie Doherty

Jackie Doherty

Manager of Learning Experience Design, Lethbridge College
avatar for Erin Howard

Erin Howard

Associate Dean, Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation, Lethbridge College
I am part of the leadership team in the Centre for Teaching, Learning, and Innovation. I am passionate about learning experience design, curriculum, educational development, competency-based education, human-centered design, and student core competency development.


Tuesday May 12, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Ballroom 2

2:35pm

Coffee/Snack
Tuesday May 12, 2020 2:35pm - 3:00pm
TBA

3:00pm

Addressing Local and Regional Learning Needs at Community Colleges
The traditional mission of a community college is to address the learning needs that arise locally and regionally. In an increasingly diverse, unsettled, and shifting economy, rigid traditional models of education and modes of delivery interfere with that mission. If colleges are to remain relevant and vital in helping address changing needs locally, regionally, and nationally, we need to disrupt and adapt the way we “do” college education.

Doug Jamieson will ask how post-secondary can be more responsive to major economic shift by asking, “What happens when a small community loses one of its major employers? What happens when an industry is in decline or faces massive technological change and/or diminishing social license?” and “How can we leverage new opportunities and deliver new and meaningful programming to skilled people looking to retrain and return to work quickly? How do we equip people to enter a shifting work economy for the first time?”

Wendy Male notes that a shift to competency-based education (CBE) promised learning which would address the pace and plasticity of ever-evolving clinical environments, but implementation—and therefore student progress—has proven problematic, in part due to the inherent constraints of the cohort model which favors procedure-driven clinical education. She asks, “If we cling to rigid educational practices, how can we develop agile, responsive health professionals ready to adapt to shifting realities and future change? How might institutions and systems themselves adapt to allow this?”

Jonathon Penny will ask how ‘modularity’ of curricula and flexibility of delivery can constructively transform even the staid and deeply entrenched area of traditional academic study, with a special interest in interlocking credentials, laddered curricula, structural options, and the interplay between disciplinary knowledge with practical experience to increase outputs. He asks, “How do we protect and preserve what is vital in the traditional disciplines while responding to and even anticipating socioeconomic shifts?”

Paula Hayden will offer cross-sectional comment focused on the role of teaching and learning technology.


Tuesday May 12, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom 2

3:00pm

Crafting Circle Education Discussion
Crafting Circle Education Discussion

For years, knitting and fibre arts crafts have been used to disrupt society - even being used as espionage during World War II. “Spies have been known to work code messages into knitting, embroidery, hooked rugs, etc,” according to the 1942 book "A Guide to Codes and Signals".

So why not use fibre arts (knitting, crochet, spinning, needlepoint) as a way to “disrupt” the conference presentation? In this session, join our crafting circle! Bring your fibre arts crafts and any topics you want to discuss. We will centre the conversation/discussion around current issues and events in education.

Speakers

Tuesday May 12, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Salon D

3:00pm

Disrupt and Transform with Liberating Structures' Punctuations
Liberating Structures are all about disrupting and transforming how we meet, teach, and lead. Punctuations are short LS “processes between processes” that can help shift energy, focus and thinking, and amplify results in individual, small or large group situations.

Users in the worldwide LS community describe punctuations as road signs, book ends, tools for priming the pump, and chemistry to get the genie out of the bottle! There are punctuations to help set intentions, check in with self, increase empathy for others, surface emotions and feelings, deepen reflection, and more.

In this session you’ll experience:
  • a series of 15-minute playful punctuation activities that you can immediately use on their own or alongside longer Liberating Structures or other activities in your classrooms, meetings, workshops and online to help “thicken” results.
  • A “meta” discussion of how we addressed considerations around inclusion when facilitating with punctuations to help transform YOUR teaching and meeting facilitation in a way that aims to include everyone.

Moderators
avatar for Tracy Roberts

Tracy Roberts

Director, Learning & Teaching, BCcampus

Speakers
avatar for Beth Cougler Blom

Beth Cougler Blom

Beth Cougler Blom


Tuesday May 12, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom 1

3:00pm

Supporting Students with Disabilities (SWD) Transitioning from Post-Secondary to Careers
Topic
Working towards supporting students with disabilities (SWD) in transitioning from an post-secondary academic setting to a career/experiential learning setting. This session is relevant to career advisors, co-op coordinators, employers, students, faculty and anyone interested in equity, diversity and inclusion work.

Pedagogy
As a Registered Social Worker, MSW student and Accessibility Experiential Learning Coordinator at Thompson Rivers University (TRU), I approach my work using anti-oppressive, critical disability and critical discourse theory. Pedagogically speaking, these approaches align well with transformative social justice work in that: Anti-oppressive practice theory aims to reduce power differentials, empower, and give voice to people living on the social, cultural and political margins; critical disability theory challenges the social construction of disability by deconstructing how disability is perceived, experienced and defined by Western society; and critical discourse theory seeks to contentiously unpack common language used related to disability.

Disruption and Transformation Work at TRU
The Thompson Rivers University Career and Experiential Learning Department (CEL) is working diligently on accessibility initiatives to support our diverse student population. From an equity, diversity and inclusion perspective we recognize that disability is defined and experienced in different ways by different groups of people. Therefore, we are working towards inclusive service provision that acknowledges that other marginalized identities may intersect with disability. In essence, this work is being done in an effort to decolonize the academy’s approach to equity, diversity and inclusion priorities. We have approached this initiative through a process of research, engagement, education and resource development.

After several informal conversations with SWD, career practitioners, community employers and TRU faculty, common themes emerged in the following areas:

• Knowledge about accessibility and accommodations
• Attitudes about disability
• Understanding the legal duty to accommodate

Education and practical resource tools were developed based on the expressed needs of the groups interviewed. From a student-centred perspective, our priority is to create safer spaces, where we can, to cultivate a positive and supported student experience. Therefore, holistically speaking, we intend to provide education and resources to all parties involved in making this possible including community employers, faculty and CEL practitioners.

Please note, common themes above were identified in the social, environmental and political context that informs the culture of TRU and the surrounding communities.

Speakers
JM

Jennifer Mei

Accessibility Services Advisor, Thompson Rivers Universtiy


Tuesday May 12, 2020 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom 3

4:15pm

Childcare Closes
Tuesday May 12, 2020 4:15pm - 4:30pm

4:20pm

Field Trip: Fluevog
Speakers
avatar for Tracy Roberts

Tracy Roberts

Director, Learning & Teaching, BCcampus


Tuesday May 12, 2020 4:20pm - 5:30pm

4:30pm

Field Trip: TBA
Tuesday May 12, 2020 4:30pm - 5:40pm
Hotel Foyer

4:40pm

Field Trip: TBA
Tuesday May 12, 2020 4:40pm - 5:50pm
Hotel Foyer
 
Wednesday, May 13
 

7:00am

Registration Opens
Wednesday May 13, 2020 7:00am - 7:00am

7:30am

Networking Breakfast
Networking topics and groups:
1. Liberating Structures
2. Coaching
3. Universal Design for Learning

Wednesday May 13, 2020 7:30am - 8:45am
Harbourfront Ballrooms

7:30am

Breakfast
Wednesday May 13, 2020 7:30am - 9:00am
Harbourfront Ballrooms

8:00am

Fit Break
Speakers
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Advisor, Teaching & Learning and Researcher, Open Education Practices, BCCampus


Wednesday May 13, 2020 8:00am - 8:30am

8:00am

Guided Meditation
Speakers
avatar for Mary Burgess

Mary Burgess

Executive Director, BCcampus
Open Education, Teaching and Learning, Educational Technology, Leadership, organizational change...


Wednesday May 13, 2020 8:00am - 8:30am

8:30am

Childcare Opens
Wednesday May 13, 2020 8:30am - 9:00am

9:00am

Keynote: The Perfect System of Post-Secondary Education (Tanysha Klassen)
Speakers
TK

Tanysha Klasse

Chairperson, BC Federation of Students


Wednesday May 13, 2020 9:00am - 10:15am
Harbourfront Ballrooms

10:15am

Coffee/Snack
Wednesday May 13, 2020 10:15am - 10:45am

10:45am

TBA
Wednesday May 13, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Salon D

10:45am

Supplementing Field Instruction with Videos and Dynamic Quizzing
In FRST 201 – Forest Ecology at the University of British Columbia, students learn identification and ecological characteristics of 69 key plant species. This knowledge is critical for responsible forest management and requisite for subsequent courses. This is primarily taught in the field (e.g., at Pacific Spirit Regional Park and Cypress Provincial Park) during laboratory sessions.

Unfortunately, with high enrollment, it is challenging for all students to have adequate time to fully examine the plants in the field. Language obstacles, particularly specialized terminology, add additional challenge for English-language learners. Lastly, around 75 Chinese students transfer into forestry each year after completing 2 or 3 years of forestry education at partner universities in China. These students generally receive transfer credit for an equivalent Chinese course, so they are not entirely prepared for upper-level courses requiring knowledge of BC plants.

To better support student learning, we developed three resources. The primary resource is a publicly available collection of professionally produced 1-2 minute videos for 50 of the plants (http://bit.ly/BCPlants). These videos were filmed in the field, introducing the plants, showing key identification characteristics, and discussing the soil moisture and soil nutrient levels indicated by each. We deliberately chose the medium of video because it allows students to see the plants being touched and manipulated as they are described, conveying a better sense of scale and structure compared to what is possible from a photograph. In addition to the videos, we developed a companion website with photographs, botanical drawings, and text for each plant. Lastly, to promote student learning through the use of retrieval practice, we created a dynamic quizzing system (using Gravity Forms with WordPress) where students select which species they would like to be quizzed on, and practice quizzes are randomly generated based on a variety of question templates.

In this session I will present some of the videos, demonstrate the adaptive quizzing system, discuss the challenges in developing these materials, and share results from a student use and feedback survey.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Culbert

Patrick Culbert

Instructor, UBC Faculty of Forestry
I am a landscape ecologist in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences in the Faculty of Forestry of the University of British Columbia. My research interests include spatial patterns of biodiversity, land-use change, and the legacies of agricultural land use. As an instructor... Read More →


Wednesday May 13, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Ballroom 3

10:45am

Disrupting Teaching & Learning with Liberating Structures: The CapU Practice Group (W3)
Disrupting Teaching & Learning with Liberating Structures: The CapU Practice Group (W3)

As Educational Developer at CapU, I was excited to spread the practice of Liberating Structures (LS), a collection of 33+ powerful structures for facilitating group processes developed by Keith McCandless and Henri Lipmanowicz. I felt that the potential to “disrupt” more traditional teaching was obvious, and while many faculty members were interested in including and engaging students actively in learning, several were also looking for specific tools and facilitation strategies to do so. LS were easily accessible to anyone and could be scaled up and down, adjusted and strung to fit the learning context and the lesson outcomes.

In the fall of 2018, with the support from BCcampus, we held our first CapU Faculty Liberating Structures Practice Group meet-up. Today, the group functions as a community of practice, where faculty join the monthly meet-up and take turns facilitating two or three LS’s, followed by a debrief and share on applications in the classroom. We have a small active membership core, and a larger group of occasional and peripheral participants. The open drop-in model works well for faculty, and for some, a couple of meet-ups are all they need to start or sustain their own practice.

When I hear stories or comments about LS from faculty members such as “the students LOVED it” or “I no longer use PowerPoint”, I know that the small disruptions are happening in the classrooms – and that we are planting the seeds for larger impact on student learning.

In this session, I will share my experience with implementing and coordinating the Liberating Structures Practice Group for Faculty at CapU. Using the LS What? So What? Now What? as a framework to reflect on what we’ve learned so far, why this matters, and on implications and next steps, I invite participants to reflect on implications and actions in relation to their own teaching and learning, and, as relevant, to their liberating structures practice. Expect to be actively involved and to come away inspired to take action, whether you have experience with liberating structures or not.

Speakers
BB

Bettina Boyle

Capilano University


Wednesday May 13, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Salon F

10:45am

Disability in Open Education
Conversations about disability in open education often focus on accessibility, which is framed as a process done for disabled students by abled instructors or instructional designers. Relatively little attention has been paid to the idea of disabled people as OER content creators, changemakers or disrupters.This session, led by two instructors who identify as disabled, explores possibilities for cripping open. We invite participants to think of access as a symbiotic experience exchange rather than something done for a student with a disability, and to see legitimacy in the “insider knowledge” held by disabled people (Smith, 1987; 2002).

Here, we will use cripping as a “verb to describe a process of critique, disruption, and re-imagining…[It is] deployed and redeployed for political purposes as a way to re-imagine conceptual boundaries, relationships, communities, cultural representations, and power structures.” (Hutcheon & Wolbring, 2013). Our session will use narrative, multimedia and reflective activities to ask:
What assumptions and practices of open education and open pedagogy would we expose by cripping open?
What assumptions do we make about instructors’ bodies and who holds knowledge?
How could disabled perspectives and voices destabilize narratives around open?
How would cripping invite us to consider how “we create and hold space”? (Cedillo, 2018). What intersections and boundaries would we encounter?
What would happen to our genres, our gatherings and our pedagogies if we framed disability as generative rather than deficit?

This session will also put cripping into praxis by inviting participants to engage in the manner that feels right to them. We will share our own stories of how disability informs our pedagogy as well as some examples of how disabled people are using open tools and pedagogies for social justice; make space for disabled voices and narratives (some in person, some via online mediums); and offer some reflective activities and conversations meant to help us probe these questions. We see this session as the beginning of a conversation, and hope that participants will leave at least one idea of how cripping might transform their pedagogy or open education work.

Speakers

Wednesday May 13, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Ballroom 1

10:45am

Accessibility Legislation Impacts on Education
British Columbia is embarking on the process of developing provincial accessibility legislation. While we cannot predict what the future holds, it is possible to start preparing for the inevitable changes that will need to be made to ensure accessibility in higher education. This discussion will focus on examining the structure of accessibility legislation currently in place in other jurisdictions, including Ontario and the US, and the impact these legislative regimes have had on education systems.

Participants will gain an understanding of the legislative timelines, components, and implementation in other jurisdictions with an analysis of the gaps in existing legislative environments. We will look at what lessons BC can take from these other jurisdictions, and what we can learn from their successes and challenges. This session will also provide insights into accessibility issues currently impacting students pursuing higher education in BC, and provide practices participants can begin to implement right now to address the areas most likely to be impacted first by changes to the legal accessibility landscape.

Speakers
CP

Corrie Playford

Accessibility Librarian, CAPER-BC


Wednesday May 13, 2020 10:45am - 11:15am
Ballroom 2

10:45am

Striving for Remote Parity: Reducing the Carbon Crater Left By Academic Conferences
Striving for Remote Parity: Reducing the Carbon Crater Left By Academic Conferences

As our world burns, many scholars around the world seek to lower their impact on the climate crisis. One of our biggest carbon sinks fills as we seek out conferences. Thousands of academics with the privilege and power to travel descend on cities through air, rail, and car, with each conference trip “amounting to 7% of an average individuals annual C02 emissions” according to one study (Spinellis and Louridas, 2013). Sales reps pitch consumption in vendor halls awash in wasteful swag. Is there a better way forward?

This session examines case studies of alternative conference models that can drastically reduce the carbon impact of conferences while also embracing open pedagogies and providing greater access to those for whom long-distance travel to conferences is difficult or impossible. The session will itself model a hybrid approach to conference sessions, with some facilitators and participants attending onsite and some online.

We will begin with a brief introduction of the impact academic conferences have on our carbon footprint. Then the facilitators will present case studies of alternative conference models, such as PressEd conference (takes place entirely on Twitter), IndieWebCamp (a global movement of local events), and Virtually Connecting (a community that connects people at conferences with those not onsite).

After each facilitator presents, small groups onsite and online (through breakout rooms in a videoconference) will discuss the benefits and drawbacks of traditional and alternative conference models around topics such as:

Equity, diversity, inclusion, accessibility
Learning from people outside one’s local network
Open practices
Costs (in terms of money and time/effort; both to host and participate)

We will then ask participants to reflect on and discuss in their small groups concrete suggestions they can give to people who organize specific conferences they are involved in (so participants will come away with a specific action item). At the end of the session we will reconvene as a large group and ask a few people to share insights and suggestions from their small group discussions.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching in Philosophy, Academic Director, Centre for Teaching, Learning & Technology, The University of British Columbia
Philosophy, OER, open textbooks, open pedagogy
avatar for Autumm Caines

Autumm Caines

Associate Director of Academic Technology, Capital University
Hi! I'm Autumm Caines @autumm on Twitter and yep those are 2 m's. I'm the Associate Director of Academic Technology at Capital University in Columbus Ohio. I blog at http://autumm.edtech.fm I like to help people in Ed Tech connect with one another through this thing called Virtually... Read More →
GM

Greg McVerry

Southern Connecticut State University


Wednesday May 13, 2020 10:45am - 12:05pm
Tuscany

10:45am

Indigenous Representation in Popular Culture
For many people working in education the media forms of Reality/Factual TV, Animated Disney blockbusters, and Computer Games are considered forces that disrupt and distract students from their real studies. I believe that we've been tricked into believing these lowbrow forms are worthless, when the real trick is that these increasing popular entertainments (often considered unworthy of scholarly activity), can be great forces of good that can lead the way in education, and even Truth & Reconciliation. When Two-spirited couple. Anthony Johnson and James Makokis, won Canada's Amazing Race in 2019, this was perhaps the first time the Two- Spirited community was seen in a positive light in the mainstream. They raised awareness, they modelled respect and love for all peoples, and they won. When Disney's 1995 Pocahontas animated film came out it was widely criticized in Indigenous circles for reinforcing damaging stereotypes and sexualizing Indigenous 'princesses'. Yet Disney took on this criticism to eventually make Moana, where they created a positive Polynesian princess who didn't need a man to fulfil her, and proved that her navigational knowledge was as good as any European science. Most recently, Frozen 2 took on the criticism that the original Frozen exploited Indigenous Sami People, and the sequel was made with Sami consultation and a Truth & Reconciliation theme. The character of Olaf the snowman can even been seen as part of the Trickster/Shapeshifter archetype found in many Indigenous cultures. Meanwhile, the gaming world has been rightly criticized for its representation of gender, race and graphic violence, but there's been a rise in positive Indigenous games (like Never Alone), and academic/game designers like Dr. Elizabeth Le Pensee (Anishanaabe/Metis/Irish) So how can we take what are often considered disruptive forces and use them to help our goals of Indigenization/Decolonisation and stop demonizing popular culture. I'd like to throw that wero (challenge in Maori) out to everyone. I'd like people to bring along their prejudices about these forms, and also perhaps their pride/guilty pleasure in finding worth in some of these, to share and to play, and see if the tribe has indeed spoken... but we haven't been listened. Nga mihi nui / many thanks David Geary (Taranaki Maori / Pakeha - English/Irish/Scottish settler, and Canadian since 2008)

Speakers
avatar for David Geary

David Geary

Instructor, Capilano University
I teach scriptwriting in the IIDF Indigenous Independent Filmmaking program at Cap U, documentary, playwriting, and write haiku on twitter @gearsgeary. I'm from the New Zealand Maori iwi/tribe Taranaki and the settler nations of England, Scotland, and Ireland; and now also a Canadian... Read More →


Wednesday May 13, 2020 10:45am - 12:05pm
Salon E

11:15am

Transition
Wednesday May 13, 2020 11:15am - 11:35am
TBA

11:35am

TBA
Wednesday May 13, 2020 11:35am - 12:05pm
Ballroom 3

11:35am

Ethics in Disrupting Educational Pedagogy
In every aspect of life in the twenty-first century, we are confronted with this notion of disruption. Heralded as an unmitigated good in many quarters, “disruptive innovation” once meant the creation of a new market that overtakes an existing one, but now we use it colloquially to refer to significant change. In education, we are sold tools that “disrupt” plagiarism, classroom management, and grading, and often the promise of change outpaces the conversation about ethics, implementation, and usage. At the same time, many of the innovations that truly have the potential to disrupt education in meaningful ways find themselves co-opted by the neoliberal college/university and its magnetic attraction to the status quo. Too often, the disruption for sale is primarily performative, and tools that promise revolution only reify existing power relationships: a plagiarism detector that mines and resells student data; a classroom management tool that relies on digital surveillance; a grading assistant that teaches an AI how to auto-grade.
    If we really seek to disrupt education – to make it decolonial, democratic, accessible, equitable – we have to unsettle the institution as a whole. This presentation uses recent case studies to explore the intersections of resistance and disruption and reflect on how emergent classroom technologies can only meaningfully “disrupt” when partnered with a critical pedagogy that interrogates the ethics, implementation, and usage of these tools; it also offers a toolkit that instructors and those working in instructional support can use to interrogate the practices at their own institutions. Most importantly, it offers a call to action for all educators interested in “disruption” to look critically at their own practice and unsettle their own pedagogies in the quest for disruption and transformation.

Speakers
avatar for Brenna Clarke Gray

Brenna Clarke Gray

Educational Technologist, TRU Open Learning
Brenna Clarke Gray is an educational technologist by day and a comics scholar by night. She writes on representations of Canada in American comic books and the failings of the Canadian academy in equal measure. You can find her on Twitter: @brennacgray.


Wednesday May 13, 2020 11:35am - 12:05pm
Salon D

11:35am

Sprinting to the finish line: Resources for guiding OER development
Sprinting to the finish line: Resources for guiding OER development

Writing sprints have been shown to be an effective way to provide faculty and students time to focus on the writing and development of OER resources. From the development of question banks to adapting resources to full textbook development, focused space and time has been shown to be a needed support for OER and OEP development (Jhangiani, Pitt, Hendricks, Key & Lalonde, 2016). The efficient organization and implementation of sprints can be one way to develop inclusive and accessible learning opportunities through OERs and open educational practice.

Over the past year at Thompson Rivers University an interdisciplinary support team has helped organize a variety of sprints, building on existing resources (UBC Sprint Toolkit Wiki, n.d., Accessibility Toolkit, 2010) to develop checklists, guides and workshops to help provide effective time management during this precious in-person time. In addition we have focused on incorporating student-voices through participation and feedback sessions, the inclusion of multiple perspectives, and ensuring accessibility. This session will provide an overview of the types of promising practices we have found so far, present the sprint resources we have developed and adapted, and also provide time and space for participants to present and share their own ideas and effective practices for helping provide faculty/student supports.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Harrison

Michelle Harrison

Senior Instructional Designer and Assistant Professor, TRU Open Learning
Michelle Harrison is a senior instructional designer and assistant professor at TRU Open Learning. She is currently a BCcampus Open Education Research Fellow and has been supporting openness at TRU through OER development and adoption, helping establish TRU’s open education working... Read More →


Wednesday May 13, 2020 11:35am - 12:05pm
Salon F

11:35am

Bringing Everyone into Our Circle: UDL + Indigenous Methods = Community
In September 2019, we embarked on a 1-year, specially-funded, Universal Design for Learning (UDL) project at Camosun College. Our project team was comprised of two faculty from the college’s Learning Services department and two students. The primary goal of this project was to help increase the application of UDL practices & accessibility standards across the college community – with a particular focus on all Student Services (e.g. Registration, Admissions, Libraries, Financial Aid, Co-op Services, etc.).

Under the medical-model of accommodation that is practiced by most post-secondary education institutions, academic accommodations are only available to students with a registered disability and the accommodations they receive only apply to the teaching & learning environment; accommodations do not apply when students with a disability are trying to access student services. Furthermore, no accommodations are available to students who don’t qualify for the medical-model of accommodations (e.g. International students, etc.).

Our project goals were essentially two-fold:
1. Through stories shared with us by our student community, help members of our community to “know what they don’t know” about accessibility challenges and barriers for students at the college, and
2. Develop a set of CC-BY licensed and UDL-based learning tools, including a “rubric”-type tool with integrated references to the students’ stories, that any area of the college could refer to when seeking practical and “universal” solutions to the accessibility challenges our students encounter.

Our project team employed the Indigenous research method of circle-based discussions with participating students from across the college. We also provided an online survey-type format for students to contribute their stories if they preferred that to meeting in a circle.

Our intention was that by the end of the academic year, we would have the first-edition of our tools ready to pilot with a couple of units in the Learning Services area of the college.

Speakers
avatar for Sue Doner

Sue Doner

Faculty, Instructional Designer, Camosun College
Instructional Designer: especially interested in Universal Design for Learning; Accessibility in online learning


Wednesday May 13, 2020 11:35am - 12:05pm
Ballroom 2

12:05pm

Lunch
Wednesday May 13, 2020 12:05pm - 1:15pm
Harbourfront Ballrooms

12:30pm

Fit Break
Speakers
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Advisor, Teaching & Learning and Researcher, Open Education Practices, BCCampus


Wednesday May 13, 2020 12:30pm - 1:00pm

1:15pm

TBA
Wednesday May 13, 2020 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Salon F

1:15pm

First Peoples Principles of Learning Resource
The modern world is characterized by connection facilitated through technology, and many educators seek ways to help students obtain the 21st Century skills needed to navigate our globalized connected world.  In British Columbia, a reasonably new framework, but one rooted in centuries of knowledge and teachings, is the under-explored and under-utilized First Peoples Principles of Learning (FPPL). This set of guiding principles recognizes and emphasizes the notion that connectedness and reciprocity are inherent in learning. Further, we feel that the FPPL offer educators and learners a holistic way to approach teaching and learning that honours and recognizes Indigenous ways of knowing. Our online resource can help teachers bridge the gap with technology. Through our resource, we explain the origins and importance of the FPPL, we provide deep mapping and H5P interactivities that focuses on the connection between place, personal storytelling and identity, and we provide several specific lesson ideas that use technology to incorporate the FPPL into the classroom.  
Please view the resource at: https://learningconference-fppl.trubox.ca/

Speakers
JD

Jamie Drozda

Thompson Rivers University


Wednesday May 13, 2020 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Salon E

1:15pm

Evaluating Short-Term International Service Learning Courses
International Service Learning (ISL) has been increasing in popularity with students as an opportunity to broaden their experiences and expand their resumes (Benson, 2015; Foller-Carroll & Charlebois, 2016; Kuo & Fowler, 2008). Yet, international service travel, particularly short-term travel, is often criticized for being patronizing and promoting negative stereotypes, so this presentation will look at how students and instructors can evaluate short-term ISL courses to better anticipate positive student outcomes. Bringle, Hatcher & Jones define an ISL course as “A structured academic experience in another country in which students (a) participate in an organized service activity that addresses identified community needs; (b) learn from the direct interaction and cross-cultural dialogue with others; and (c) reflect on the experience in such a way as to gain further understanding of course content, a deeper understanding of global and intercultural issues, a broader appreciation of the host country and discipline, and an enhanced sense of their own responsibilities as citizens, locally and globally.” (2009, p. 38). However, despite this detailed definition, there doesn’t seem to be standards or regulations as to how these courses are structured and concern arises that certain types of ISL experiences can promote colonialism and reinforce stereotypes of people in need (McGloin & Georgeou, 2016; Sanguinetti, 2013 ). Three variables can be identified to examine different models of short-term (one to six week) ISL experiences with different courses structured differently across each variable. These variables include: 1. project design, 2. level of community interaction, and; 3. focus on service or learning. It is proposed that ISL experiences designed to provide international aide or charity, involve transactional communication and focus on a service experience are less likely to produce the desired long-term effects on students compared to courses designed to co-create value, stimulate empowerment and emancipation, and foster transformational learning. This presentation looks at case study examples of short-term ISL immersion experiences offered directly from a post-secondary institution or through a contracted agency and uses a model of course development to evaluate how these courses achieve desired outcomes including long-term global citizenship, social engagement, curiosity and open-mindedness. 

Speakers
avatar for Sheilagh Seaton

Sheilagh Seaton

Faculty, Okanagan College


Wednesday May 13, 2020 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Salon D

1:15pm

Focus on First Year: Engaging Faculty Learning Communities to Support Student Success
Focus on First Year: Engaging Faculty Learning Communities to Support Student Success
Thompson Rivers University (TRU) is an open- access institution located in Kamloops. It has transformed rapidly over the past 50 years, growing from Cariboo College in 1978 to its current standing as comprehensive university. TRU is responsive to the needs of the Cariboo and Thompson regions and beyond through the reach of Open Learning. This fall, TRU welcomed over 3,500 international students from over 100 countries. Though TRU has a history as a transfer institution, granting credits for students to ladder into other provincial programs, we have a strong commitment to seeing our students stay for the completion of their program from beginning to end. It is this commitment that led to the development of the Focus on First Year (FOFY) project, bringing together faculty from across the campus to initiate supports and programming to help mitigate our 40% attrition rate and to support faculty in building a sense of belonging among our diverse population of first- year students.
During this presentation we will share the development and history of the FOFY project, stemming from its development at the Teaching and Learning National Institute in 2018. Using institutional data and the lens of equity, diversity, and inclusion, we have identified particular characteristics of vulnerable students who are most at risk of not returning for the second year of study. In just over one year we have seeded three faculty learning communities which have brought together approximately 30 faculty members in teams using a student-centered approach to develop projects to increase a sense of belonging and promote retention. The presenters in this session will share their own parts of the story of this program’s development and growth, including the roots of our foundational questions, the composition of the faculty learning communities, and their take on the first-year attrition problem. We plan to share with the audience the various ways we have supported the development of our FLCs and how we plan to help them grow and continue to make transformative change from within the classroom for years to come.

Speakers
avatar for Catharine Dishke Hondzel

Catharine Dishke Hondzel

Thompson Rivers University
NC

Nancy Carson

Economics
avatar for Bruno Cinel

Bruno Cinel

Associate Professor, Physical Sciences (Chemistry), Thompson Rivers University
avatar for Donna Petri

Donna Petri

AVP Academic, Thompson Rivers University
AM

Amie McLean

Intercultural Coordinator, Faculty of Student Development
Amie McLean is an Intercultural Coordinator at Thompson Rivers University. Her work has consistently focused on issues of equity, inclusion, and social justice. Her Ph.D. in Sociology examined the dynamics of race, class, and gender in the BC-based long haul trucking industry. She... Read More →


Wednesday May 13, 2020 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Ballroom 2

1:15pm

Student Perceptions of Openness: Survey of Current Literature
Session Title: Student Perceptions of Openness: Survey of Current Literature
To date, there is little research that speaks to the student perceptions of open education environments (Childs, Axe, Veletsianos & Webster, 2019). As higher education institutions change to meet the requirements of contemporary learners, there is a need to discuss the benefits and challenges of implementing open education practices in these spaces. This session will share a review of current literature focused on student perceptions of open educational practices and digital pedagogies implemented within open education environments.  By open education environments, we refer to practices that include student and instructor use of institutionally supported open source blogging and other collaboration tools accessible on the open Web, as well as learner-chosen social media. Having an enhanced understanding of the student experience provides course developers and instructors insights into supports that are necessary for students and faculty working in open education environments. Themes emerging from the literature review as well as the gaps that were identified will be discussed. In addition, challenges in addressing these gaps and obtaining student views will be explored. A detailed author matrix and reference list will be shared, and implications for practice identified.  

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Professor & Program Head, Royal Roads University (RRU)
At RRU we are designing a Masters program with openness, networked learning and digital mindset as core design principles.


Wednesday May 13, 2020 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Ballroom 3

1:15pm

ETUG: BC's Educational Technology Users Group
BC’s Educational Technology Users Group (ETUG) is a community that exists to empower and inspire all who design, develop, and support learning experiences.  In this three-part session, the Stewardship Committee for ETUG will share what we do and how we support educators in the creative and effective use of educational technologies for learning.  We will invite participants to share their ETUG and edtech experiences (both disruptive and transformational) with the group, which will lead us into an unconference, taking the topics generated by the group into robust and engaging conversations.  In addition we will be looking for ideas and thoughts around how we can better serve and connect the ETUG community and all those who use and support educational technology in post-secondary institutions across B.C.  Come and see who we are, what we do, and what we can do for you.

1. Lightning round about ETUG and what we do
2. Sharing trends and participant generated topics
3. Unconference

Speakers
avatar for Keith Webster

Keith Webster

Associate Director - Learning Technologies, Royal Roads University
I have been an educator for several decades. As an instructor in the Canadian Forces, with a brief turn as a high school teacher, becoming an educational technologist and instructional designer at the University of Victoria in 2004. I became an instructional designer at Royal Roads... Read More →
avatar for Terri Bateman

Terri Bateman

Distributed Learning Facilitator, North Island College
avatar for Emily Schudel

Emily Schudel

Instructional Designer, eLearning, Camosun College
I am an Instructional Designer in the eLearning unit of the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. I have worked as an instructional designer for 20 years, and have worked with faculty enhancing their courses with technology, faculty teaching blended courses (combining face-to-face... Read More →


Wednesday May 13, 2020 1:15pm - 2:35pm
Tuscany

1:45pm

Transition
Wednesday May 13, 2020 1:45pm - 2:05pm
TBA

2:05pm

Lightning Session
1. Harnessing the Power of Educational Technologies 
Lisa Gedak, Robin Leung
In this 10-minute PechaKucha lightening session, we will present the challenges that face 21st century instructors in the adoption and implementation of technological innovations in the classroom. This session will provide attendees with a brief overview of the challenge's educators face when pedagogy and technology intersect; and will provide some practical solutions to incorporating technological innovations into teaching practice.
Some of the topics we will discuss includes the role of technology plays in different learning environments, the adoption of active learning classrooms, keeping pace with new technology growth, and integration of educational media.
Most faculty and instructors want to work smarter and not harder; this session will explore how to harness the power of education technologies and media effectively to empower students to take control of their learning.

2. 10 Open Activities to Try in Your Class Today
Tannis Morgan, Melanie Meyers, Krista Lambert 
Thinking about incorporating open activities in your teaching and wondered how to get started? This lightening session is a look at real examples of open pedagogy from a variety of institutions with a focus on what your colleagues are doing in BC. Sit back, don’t relax and get ready for a rapid-fire session of activities that you can start using in your classroom today!

3. Critical Exploration of Media Literacy 
Esteban Morales 
Social media is nowadays central to how many of us make sense of the world and what is happening around us. Moreover, our relation to social media is not passive but an essential element in participatory culture. These dialogical spaces have become an important scenario where people exercise their citizenship and struggle with societal concerns (such as disinformation, climate change, human rights and nationalism), hoping to understand, influence or change existing power dynamics. However, many today would compare this digital ecosystem with an ongoing and never-ending conflict: violence hiding behind every tab and every social media interaction.
This presentation will lead participants to a critical exploration of how media literacy can be approached in post secondary institutions through the lens of peace education. Attendees to the presentation will explore a conceptual and practical framework to promote the empowerment of learners in higher education settings, looking to make sense of direct, cultural, structural and post-structural violence that is present in social media environments and finding possible nodes of empowerment that could translate into transformative actions. Lessons from this presentation could be integrated into a critical integration of technology for educational purposes.



Speakers
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Advisor, Teaching & Learning and Researcher, Open Education Practices, BCCampus
avatar for Melanie Meyers

Melanie Meyers

Project Manager, BCcampus
avatar for Lisa Gedak

Lisa Gedak

Teaching and Learning with Technologies Strategist, KPU
Educational technology and the intersection of technology and pedagogy


Wednesday May 13, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Ballroom 1

2:05pm

Disrupting the Norm: Indigenous Pedagogy and Teacher Education
Disrupting the Norm- Indigenous Pedagogy and Teacher Education

Matters related to Indigenous peoples have come to the national consciousness of Canadians in recent times. This awakening of the nation to the issues relative to Indigenous peoples have reverberated from sector to sector. This recognition that Indigenous matters are consequential to national and community development has implications and disruptions for teacher education programs.
The disruption in teacher education programs are necessary for schools to achieve the following two major goals (a) to educate students in academic and cognitive skills and (b) to educate students to function occupationally and socio-politically in society (Fullan, 1982). To promote a nuanced understanding of Indigenous peoples and adequately address their way of knowing, teacher education programs must position preservice teachers to utilize the appropriate Indigenous pedagogy and ways of knowing in their teaching praxis. Using Fullan’s (1982) construct of change in education, this paper examines the extent to which teacher education programs can play a pivotal role, in bridging the disruption that should occur in teacher education programs.
Facilitating an understanding of Indigenous ways of knowing challenges the fabric of teacher education, where the organization and structure of knowledge systems have followed the Western pattern for centuries. Traditionally, knowledge acquisition has been based, to a great extent, on book knowledge and less on other forms of knowing. This paper examines disruptions to the norm and steps taken by one university, while collaborating with Indigenous peoples on education matters, bringing together different epistemologies and ideologies that influence its teacher education program.


Speakers

Wednesday May 13, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Salon E

2:05pm

Disrupting Police Training
Disrupting police training:

Policing is a paramilitary culture that has traditionally relied on lecture heavy curriculum to train new police officers. In 2016, the JIBC Police Academy implemented a new curriculum model to train all new municipal police recruits in BC. This new model disrupts traditional training norms by introducing frequent simulations followed by reflective practice, goal setting, peer feedback, integration of junior and senior recruit training, near-peer leadership development, and longitudinal support from policing mentors. Transformative learning theory is central to this new training model.

Early in police training, the scenario training for junior and senior recruits is integrated: the senior recruits run scenarios for the junior recruits while the junior recruits participate in senior scenarios as actors, filmers, and observers. The senior recruit scenarios are sequenced so that the coincide with topics that are relevant to the next week’s topic for the junior recruits, providing a first exposure to certain types of calls. Using recruits as actors provides an opportunity to experience a variety of different communication strategies and to build empathy for the people they encounter on a day to day basis. Selecting senior recruits to run the junior scenarios and provide feedback to the junior recruits builds leadership and enhances senior recruit knowledge.

The feedback cycle following scenario training is designed around transformative learning theory and incorporates opportunities for guided reflection, goal setting, reviewing video and re-assessing self-conceptions, and receiving feedback from an assigned policing mentor. This process disrupted the traditional approach to police training scenarios by incorporating self-assessment, video feedback, and longitudinal mentorship.

This 30 minute presentation will outline the structure of the new curriculum and how it supports deep learning, as well as describe the feedback-cycle process and how it creates opportunities for transformative learning to occur. The session will be of interest to a wide audience as the approach can be applied across a variety of disciplines and is not specific to police training.

Speakers

Wednesday May 13, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Ballroom 2

2:05pm

Imaginative Assessment for Learning (AFL) in Post-Secondary
Imaginative Assessment for Learning (AFL) in Post-Secondary: Exploring The Impact of Cognitive Tools on Students’ Learning, Engagement, and Demonstrations of Understanding

Imagination doesn't get much airtime in post-secondary education. When it does, it is often described as a "hook" for learning rather than the heart of engaging and effective teaching practice*. Discussion of imagination in the context of assessment for student learning (AFL) is even more rare. This session shares some research into imaginative assessment for learning practices in post-secondary. Within the context of AFL practice, we looked specifically at engagement. One premise of our research is that emotional and imaginative engagement lie at the heart of effective learning—in order to remember, we must be affected. A team of faculty from across SFU co-created and implemented in their graduate/undergraduate classes AFL activities that employed “cognitive tools”—learning tools such as story, imagery, wonder, mystery that engage imagination and emotion with knowledge. Cognitive tools are learning tools at the heart of Dr. Kieran Egan’s theory of Imaginative Education. Cognitive tools develop the imagination by engaging emotion and connecting it with knowledge in the process of learning. As a whole philosophy of education, Imaginative Education offers an understanding of how cognitive tools impact the growth of knowledge in the mind, and how they impact the shape of the imagination during our lives. CIRCE [the Centre for Imagination in Research, Culture and Education—formerly the Imaginative Education Research Group] has developed innovative teaching methods that centralize emotional and imaginative engagement in the teaching and learning process. Research into how cognitive tools can impact student learning in post-secondary is new. *NOTE: In this research, imagination is defined as the ability to think of the possible, not just the actual in all things; it is the source of invention, novelty, and flexibility in human thinking; it is not distinct from rationality but is rather a capacity that greatly enriches rational thinking; it is tied to our ability to form images in the mind, and image-forming commonly involves emotions. We use the term "imaginative" in relation to AFL to refer to activities that employ cognitive tools.

Speakers
avatar for Gillian Judson

Gillian Judson

Executive Director, SFU/Centre for Imagination in Research, Culture and Education (CIRCE)
Dr. Gillian Judson is a long-term lecturer at Simon Fraser University and one of the directors of the Imaginative Education Research Group. Her research is primarily concerned with sustainability and how an ecologically sensitive and imaginative approach to education can both increase... Read More →


Wednesday May 13, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Salon F

2:05pm

Student Wellness and Applied Programs at Vancouver Community College
Student wellness is an important focus across the post-secondary landscape. At Vancouver Community College the Fashion Design and Production Program recently engaged in a pilot project of co-curricular recognition as part of a multi-faceted wellness initiative. Informed by design thinking and critical theory, the co-curricular recognition program brings the learning cycles and dialogic approach to critical reflection occuring in the classroom into the world to recognize community leaders and support activities that contribute to the learning and broader community.

In recent years, there has been a perceived increase of issues surrounding student wellness; the factors behind this are likely complex and multi-faceted. Post-secondary institutions across Canada are noticing benefits of co-curricular recognition programs. In the fashion program at VCC, students engage in incentivized self-directed activities (such as volunteering, contributing to the program blog, participating in the peer-support program) and reflect on the meaning and impact of these activities. The underlying goal is to improve student well-being through several avenues: recognizing community leadership, widening personal professional support networks, developing moral identity, strengthening sense of belonging, articulating expectations and desired learning culture, bridging the gap between understanding social issues and taking action, and critically reflecting for sense-making and assumption acknowledgement.

For an applied arts program, design thinking is a natural fit – the curriculum informed by design thinking, and it is a mindset that students need to develop in order to thrive as designers both in and out of school. In the program, critical reflection, which involves detecting and uncovering power relations and hegemonic assumptions, and design thinking find their intersection in the explicit, cyclical, and dialogic approach to reflecting on doing and learning. In the co-curricular recognition pilot, this is expanded outside of the classroom into the community-at-large.

This presentation describes an action research project studying the co-curricular pilot through the lens of encouraging critical reflection. We consider whether offering students scholastic recognition through community engagement, and guiding them to reflect critically on their experiences, can encourage them to critically consider their assumptions, and to become empowered to not only interpret but also influence (disrupt) the world that they live in.

Speakers

Wednesday May 13, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Ballroom 3

2:05pm

Open Education Practices and Pedagogy
        Open Educational Practices (OEP) are emerging as the next step in the OER movement (Ehlers, 2011; Karunanayaka, Naidu, Rajendra, & Ratnayake, 2015).  As OER gains traction, there is a shift in focus from OER as an educational resource to a focus on OEP (Ehlers, 2011).  OEP are a set of activities that center around “the creation, use and repurposing of Open Educational Resources (OERs)” (Ehlers, 2010, p. 2). These activities and resources are not only to be created and curated by instructors, but students are encouraged to be involved in the process, to become co-creators in their own learning (Hegarty, 2015).  With open licenses that allow for adaptation and revision, educators no longer need be the sole provider of curating and producing resources. Students themselves can become part of the production process with their peers (Masterman, 2016).
As students are brought into an open pedagogical model, there is a shift in the traditional roles between students and teachers. Traditionally, teachers would be seen as a source of knowledge while the students are the receptacles (Bovill, Cook-Sather, & Felton, 2011). In an OEP model, the role of a teacher becomes one of a facilitator or mentor, guiding the students in developing their own meaning (Masterman, 2016). With the use of participatory technologies and other web 2.0 tools, it is easier than ever to collaborate on and interact with resources. Hegarty (2015) notes that this is powerful in the sense that “Learning is facilitated not only by teachers but more often than not by peers” (p. 3).
In this session, Chad Flinn will share some of the strategies and technologies he utilizes to bring his students into developing their own meaning and learning in the classroom. Chad makes the argument that not only are Open Educational Practices effective but they are, in fact, good pedagogy.


Speakers

Wednesday May 13, 2020 2:05pm - 2:35pm
Salon D

2:35pm

Coffee/Snack
Wednesday May 13, 2020 2:35pm - 3:00pm
TBA

3:00pm

Festival Finale
Speakers
avatar for Leva Lee

Leva Lee

Manager, BCcampus
In addition to the BCcampus Online Book Club (bccampusonlinebookclub.opened.ca) and ETUG History (etug.ca), feel free to ask me about stewarding communities of practice; the BCcampus Learning Access Program for Educators (LAP-E); the Scholarly Teaching and Ed Tech Fellows Programs... Read More →
avatar for Tracy Roberts

Tracy Roberts

Director, Learning & Teaching, BCcampus


Wednesday May 13, 2020 3:00pm - 3:20pm
Harbourfront Ballrooms

3:20pm

Door Prizes and Closing Remarks
Speakers
avatar for Leva Lee

Leva Lee

Manager, BCcampus
In addition to the BCcampus Online Book Club (bccampusonlinebookclub.opened.ca) and ETUG History (etug.ca), feel free to ask me about stewarding communities of practice; the BCcampus Learning Access Program for Educators (LAP-E); the Scholarly Teaching and Ed Tech Fellows Programs... Read More →
avatar for Tracy Roberts

Tracy Roberts

Director, Learning & Teaching, BCcampus


Wednesday May 13, 2020 3:20pm - 3:30pm
Harbourfront Ballrooms

4:15pm

Childcare Closes
Wednesday May 13, 2020 4:15pm - 4:30pm